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Stumped - One Cricket Umpire Two Countries A Memoir - cover

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Stumped - One Cricket Umpire Two Countries A Memoir

Richard W. Harrison

Publisher: Richard Harrison

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Summary

If you like cricket, you will love this tremendous new book.  
Light-hearted, cheerful and easy to read, Stumped presents a host of wonderful anecdotes that are sure to put a smile on anyone's face. 
From Sunday village friendlies and the County Championship, to the hallowed turf of the MCG, Stumped is the story of an anglophile Australian, whose umpiring career spans fifteen years, two countries and includes some of the best female cricketers in the world. 
An absolute must for the true cricket fan; this truly unique memoir, will remind you why cricket is the greatest game in the world. 
Get your copy now.

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