Discover a world full of books!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Such Sweet Sorrow - cover

Such Sweet Sorrow

Richard Bell

Publisher: Ginninderra Press

  • 0
  • 2
  • 0

Summary

‘With this moving free verse arising from his sustained encounter with his wife’s cancer, Richard Bell lays bare the intimate reality of loss, from its dark foreshadowing in her fatal diagnosis through the rigors of her treatment to the persistence of her presence even in the yawning absence that followed her death.  In raw honesty and occasional buffering irony, with unconventional images that startle the reader into fresh acts of perception, this poetry illuminates an intimate journey that touched me with both its universality for all mortal beings and with the ultimate particularity that distinguishes each shared life from all others. I recommend it to all of those who stand in the shadow of loss, as well as to readers who seek a deeper understanding of those who do.’ – Robert A. Neimeyer, author of Techniques of Grief Therapy, The Art of Longing, and Rainbow in the Stone

Other books that might interest you

  • Arabian Nights - cover

    Arabian Nights

    Neil Duffield

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    When Sheherazad is brought to the palace to be the Sultan’s new bride, her very life depends upon her skill as a storyteller. She tells him tales of lost cities and buried treasure, of slave girls and robbers, of genies in bottles and evil sorcerers. But will it be enough to save her?
    The stories of the Arabian Nights date back more than a thousand years and originate from Persia, India and Arabia. Neil Duffield has combined elements of many of them, keeping alive the excitement and humour to produce a show which will transport the audience into a world of myth and legend where fantasy and reality can never be separated.
    Show book
  • Angina Days - Selected Poems - cover

    Angina Days - Selected Poems

    Günter Eich

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    This is the most comprehensive English translation of the work of Günter Eich, one of the greatest postwar German poets. The author of the POW poem "Inventory," among one of the most famous lyrics in the German language, Eich was rivaled only by Paul Celan as the leading poet in the generation after Gottfried Benn and Bertolt Brecht. Expertly translated and introduced by Michael Hofmann, this collection gathers eighty poems, many drawn from Eich's later work and most of them translated here for the first time. The volume also includes the original German texts on facing pages. 
      As an early member of "Gruppe 47" (from which Günter Grass and Heinrich Böll later shot to prominence), Eich (1907-72) was at the vanguard of an effort to restore German as a language for poetry after the vitriol, propaganda, and lies of the Third Reich. Short and clear, these are timeless poems in which the ominousness of fairy tales meets the delicacy and suggestiveness of Far Eastern poetry. In his late poems, he writes frequently, movingly, and often wryly of infirmity and illness. "To my mind," Hofmann writes, "there's something in Eich of Paul Klee's pictures: both are homemade, modest in scale, immediately delightful, inventive, cogent." 
      Unjustly neglected in English, Eich finds his ideal translator here.
    Show book
  • Midday at the Super-Kamiokande - cover

    Midday at the Super-Kamiokande

    Matthew Tierney

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Think Kierkegaard in a spacesuit, Kubrik in a Left Bank café.Like the neutrino observatory of its title, Midday at the Super-Kamiokande seeks "glimpses of the obscure" to carve out meaning, alternately a resistance to rationalism and its champion. It aims to tear through abstraction with the concrete, either catastrophic -- road accidents, nuclear explosions, floods, extinction, eviction, suicide -- or quotidian, finding threads of love, empathy, and belief within the fray. These poems delight in aphorism, paradox, puns, and wit, each stanza a closure that moves tangentially to the next, each poem more bricolage than narrative, more shuffle than playlist. These are poems with no middle. These are poems of beginnings, and of ends.
    Show book
  • Unbearable Splendor - cover

    Unbearable Splendor

    Sun Yung Shin

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Praise for Sun Yung Shin: 
    Finalist for the Believer Poetry Award 
    "[her] work reads like redactions, offering fragments to be explored, investigated and interrogated, making her reader equal partner in the creation of meaning."—Star Tribune 
    Sun Yung Shin moves ideas—of identity (Korean, American, adoptee, mother, Catholic, Buddhist) and interest (mythology, science fiction, Sophocles)— around like building blocks, forming and reforming new constructions of what it means to be at home. 
    What is a cyborg but a hybrid creature of excess? A thing that exceeds the sum of its parts. A thing that has extended its powers, enhanced, even superpowered.
    Show book
  • The Collected Poems - cover

    The Collected Poems

    Sylvia Plath

    • 0
    • 4
    • 0
    Pulitzer Prize winner Sylvia Plath’s complete poetic works, edited and introduced by Ted Hughes. 
    By the time of her death on 11, February 1963, Sylvia Plath had written a large bulk of poetry. To my knowledge, she never scrapped any of her poetic efforts. With one or two exceptions, she brought every piece she worked on to some final form acceptable to her, rejecting at most the odd verse, or a false head or a false tail. Her attitude to her verse was artisan-like: if she couldn’t get a table out of the material, she was quite happy to get a chair, or even a toy. The end product for her was not so much a successful poem, as something that had temporarily exhausted her ingenuity. So this book contains not merely what verse she saved, but—after 1956—all she wrote.—Ted Hughes, from the Introduction
    Show book
  • Othello - cover

    Othello

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Shakespeare’s renowned tragedy about the destruction wrought by ambition and jealousy. Othello, a Moor and general in the Venetian army, has just eloped with Desdemona, the daughter of a senator. Simultaneously, seeds of doubt are planted in Othello’s mind by the scheming Iago—an ensign who seethes with ambition and resentment—with assistance from Iago’s wealthy friend who wanted Desdemona for himself. Behind the scenes, Iago’s machinations are designed to sow discord and, ultimately, convince Othello that his wife is unfaithful—and the consequences will be tragic.
    Show book