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Death - The Scientific Facts to Help Us Understand It Better - cover

Death - The Scientific Facts to Help Us Understand It Better

Richard Beliveau, Denis Gingras

Publisher: Firefly Books

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Summary

Our love of life makes the inevitability of death very difficult to accept. Death is a comprehensive examination of that inevitable and universal human experience. To better our understanding of death--and so perhaps fear it less--the book explains the biological processes and the different causes of death, and examines the human perceptions of death throughout history and across cultures.   
  Death is abundantly illustrated with masterpieces of art, paintings and sculptures and their representations of death, as well as abundant diagrams that explain the science of death. It methodically explores the biological limits of life, the rituals of death and describes the events surrounding the loss of life, using the most current research and medical analyses.   
  Chapters cover diverse topics associated with death. They include:  
            Consciousness and the soul  How the body dies  Terminal illness and dying slowly  Methods of deathPoisons, deadly animals and plants  Flu pandemics, the new viruses  Unsanitary conditions and deadly diseases  Murder and execution  Euthanasia and ethics  Creatures from beyond the grave  Violent and dramatic deaths  Cheating death.    
  Death is sprinkled generously with humor and the wisdom of the great thinkers. Reflecting on our philosophical, scientific and spiritual understanding of death, it speaks to our visceral fears and allows us to better appreciate life.

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