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Not as Nature Intended - cover

Not as Nature Intended

Rich Hardy

Publisher: Unbound Digital

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Summary

Relying on a hidden camera, a bluff and a little bit of luck,
award-winning investigative journalist Rich Hardy finds imaginative
ways to meet the people and industries responsible for the lives and
deaths of the billions of animals used to feed, clothe and entertain us.

						 
What he discovers will shock, but it may just inspire you to re-evaluate
your relationship with all animals and what role you let them play
in your life.

						 
Sometimes dangerous, often emotional and occasionally surreal, this
one-of-a-kind perspective examines what it’s like to live and work
amongst your adversaries and what you can achieve if you feel strongly
enough about something.
‘Cruelty to animals goes on daily behind the closed doors of factory farms or deep in the forests where wild animals are trapped for their fur. Rich’s book exposes us to the raw truth behind these animal trades. Whilst it’s a deeply personal story, it has the potential to change, not just your own life, but the lives of millions of animals. I urge you to read it!’ Joanna Lumley, Actress, author and activist 'An incredible and moving exposé of the horror that animals go through to create a product that destroys the environment & keeps people sick and miserable.’ Moby, Musician and activist ‘It is beautifully and lucidly written...it avoids gratuitous expression but delivers the truth in a compelling and penetrating narrative. Not As Nature Intended is a must read.’ Peter Egan, Actor and animal advocate 'A 007 of the animal world.’ Rhian Lubin, The Daily Mirror ‘As you read this book, if you have a heart and a soul, you too won't fail to be bowled over by Rich's courage.’ Jane Dalton, The Independent ‘All the evidence we need to make our future a plant-based one.’ Christina Rees MP,  Chair of the All-Party Parliamentary Group on Vegetarianism and Veganism ‘An eye-opening insight into the horrors endured by animals around the world - and into the minds of those who risk everything to help them.’ Maria Chiorando, Plant Based News

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