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Okay God Really? - God's Love When Life Doesn't Go As Planned - cover

Okay God Really? - God's Love When Life Doesn't Go As Planned

Rhonda Hengst

Publisher: Atlantic Publishing Group, Inc.

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Summary

God is good. Multiple sclerosis is not.
 
When Rhonda Hengst imagined what her life would look like in the future, she thought she’d get married, have a few children, live in a nice home, and have a happy life. She didn’t account for multiple sclerosis. Though her plans changed, God’s plan for her life became ever clearer.
 
Looking back on the frustration surrounding her diagnosis and how she and her family coped with the world-shaking news of such a huge change to come, Rhonda recounts the strength she found in God and the plan she knew He had in store for her. Though difficult at times, she summoned the courage to put her trust and faith in the Father she knew would never push her further than she could bear.
 
Looking ever onward in her journey of complete healing and faith, Rhonda has become stronger than ever before as she finds her medicine and hope in God above and shares her message of the importance of being unconditionally faithful and believing in her healing no matter what.

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