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Shaping Urban Futures in Mongolia - Ulaanbaatar Dynamic Ownership and Economic Flux - cover

Shaping Urban Futures in Mongolia - Ulaanbaatar Dynamic Ownership and Economic Flux

Rebekah Plueckhahn

Publisher: UCL Press

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Summary

What can the generative processes of dynamic ownership reveal about how
the urban is experienced, understood and made in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia? Shaping Urban Futures in Mongolia provides an ethnography of actions,
strategies and techniques that form part of how residents precede and
underwrite the owning of real estate property – including apartments and land –
in a rapidly changing city. In doing so, it charts the types of visions of the
future and perceptions of the urban form that are emerging within Ulaanbaatar
following a period of investment, urban growth and subsequent economic
fluctuation in Mongolia’s extractive economy since the late 2000s. 
Following the way
that people discuss the ethics of urban change, emerging urban political
subjectivities and the seeking of ‘quality’, Plueckhahn explores how
conceptualisations of growth, multiplication, and the portioning of wholes
influence residents’ interactions with Ulaanbaatar’s urban landscape. Shaping
Urban Futures in Mongolia combines a study of changing postsocialist
forms of ownership with a study of the lived experience of recent
investment-fuelled urban growth within the Asia region. Examining ownership in Mongolia’s
capital reveals how residents attempt to understand and make visible the hidden
intricacies of this changing landscape.

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