Today could be the day that you start a whole year of unlimited reading!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced 7236434c7af12f85357591f712aa5cce47c3d377e8addfc98f989c55a4ef4ca5
A Thirst for Blood - The True Story of California's Vampire Killer - cover

A Thirst for Blood - The True Story of California's Vampire Killer

Ray Biondi, Walt Hecox

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 2
  • 3
  • 0

Summary

The “fast-paced” inside story of the manhunt for bloodsucking serial killer Richard Chase (Publishers Weekly).  Written by the case’s lead homicide detective, this gripping true crime account details the killing spree of one of California’s most gruesome murderers: Richard Chase, aka “the Vampire of Sacramento.” In December 1977, Sacramento police found the corpse of Teresa Wallin, a loving wife and soon-to-be mother. Veteran detective Lt. Ray Biondi immediately knew the case would be unlike anything he had ever seen before.   The victim’s body was deliberately disfigured in nightmarish ways, and evidence suggested the culprit had collected large volumes of her blood. In less than a month, a two-year-old boy was missing, and two men, another woman, and a five-year-old child dead, their bodies contorted, like Wallin’s, to fulfill the killer’s demented sexual desires, and—most disturbingly—his taste for human blood.   Previously published as The Dracula Killer, A Thirst for Blood is a riveting report of the investigation, from eyewitness testimonies to the discovery of the crime scenes to Chase’s interrogation. Lieutenant Biondi and his coauthor, Walt Hecox, provide an unflinching look at the “vampire killer” and the cunning police work that finally put an end to his reign of terror. The inspiration for Investigation Discovery’s Lore: Deadly Obsession and episodes of CSI and Criminal Minds, Chase’s crimes continue to haunt the world generations later.  

Other books that might interest you

  • The Birth of Tragedy - cover

    The Birth of Tragedy

    Friedrich Nietzsche

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Birth of Tragedy from the Spirit of Music (German: Die Geburt der Tragödie aus dem Geiste der Musik) is an 1872 work of dramatic theory by the German philosopher Friedrich Nietzsche. It was reissued in 1886 as The Birth of Tragedy, Or: Hellenism and Pessimism (Die Geburt der Tragödie, Oder: Griechentum und Pessimismus). The later edition contained a prefatory essay, An Attempt at Self-Criticism, wherein Nietzsche commented on this earliest book.
    Nietzsche found in classical Athenian tragedy an art form that transcended the pessimism and nihilism of a fundamentally meaningless world. The Greek spectators, by looking into the abyss of human suffering and affirming it, passionately and joyously affirmed the meaning of their own existence. They knew themselves to be infinitely more than petty individuals, finding self-affirmation not in another life, not in a world to come, but in the terror and ecstasy alike celebrated in the performance of tragedies.
    Show book
  • Murder in a Minute - cover

    Murder in a Minute

    Shouvik Bhattacharya

    • 0
    • 7
    • 0
    When a young woman is found lifeless in a pool of her own blood, everyone is convinced that it is her college sweetheart who murdered her. The victim's step-brothers, Rishabh and Arya,embark on a journey to unearth the truth, a journey riddled with fallacies and conspiracies, planted intentionally. What connection is there between a missing blue envelope, a misplaced sweater and stray footprints in a room. Could those people they thought they knew so well be hiding dark secrets about their past? Or did their dead sister have more to hide than they imagined?
    Show book
  • Little Gems - Marvels and Musings on Motherhood from Around the World - cover

    Little Gems - Marvels and...

    Jane Langley, Bridget Fogarty,...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 1
    "An old Russian proverb claims that labor will go more smoothly if both parents-to-be confess the names of all their previous lovers. So all that screaming and yelling you hear in the delivery suite? It might not be pain related.”When it comes to childbirth and child rearing, what can other cultures teach us about motherhood? And what can we learn from the way our great grandmothers did things? Many young women are looking to folk wisdom and folk tradition for guidance (just think of the rise in midwives, doulas, belly-binding, postpartum herb baths, and placenta smoothies). This book is full of little gems—customs, folklore, and cultural practices from around the world as well as the voices of contemporary mothers. This beautifully illustrated book is a delightful read with a good dose of humor and fun. It's a refreshingly different gift for new mothers. 
    Show book
  • Opium Traders and Their Worlds-Volume One - A Revisionist Exposé of the World's Greatest Opium Traders - cover

    Opium Traders and Their...

    M. Kienholz

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Opium Traders and Their Worlds examines the opium trade with a detective's investigative approach. The author uses evidence to dismiss many of the false claims commonly held with regard to the so-called "legitimacy" of the Old China trade, presents proof of important figures who were deeply involved in all parts of the world and shows how world events were affected by famous men in opium hierarchies.
    	Lateral contributors to the drug trade include shipbuilders who fashioned their craft to meet needs of the commerce, designing specially built Indiamen, clippers, and "fast crabs."
    	Ms. Kienholz shows how vicious competition in the trade moved players like chess pieces, with winners and losers shifting positions.
    	Her research into the production of the new "opioids" such as oxycodone is an area not previously probed.
    Show book
  • Solo Success - You CAN do things on your own - cover

    Solo Success - You CAN do things...

    Christine Ingall

    • 0
    • 6
    • 0
    Millions of people, who live alone and are without a partner, avoid everyday leisure pursuits for fear of being seen to be on their own. Many people in a relationship never do anything on their own. This step-by-step guide helps such people to conquer their fear, and build the confidence to pursue the things that they enjoy doing, regardless of their relationship status.
    Show book
  • The Psychology of Zelda - Linking Our World to the Legend of Zelda Series - cover

    The Psychology of Zelda -...

    Anthony Bean

    • 0
    • 3
    • 0
    It’s dangerous to go alone! Take this (book). 
     
    For more than 30 years, The Legend of Zelda—which immerses players in a courageous struggle against the shadowy forces of evil in a world of high fantasy—has spanned more than 30 different installments, selling over 75 million copies. Today, it is one of the most beloved video game franchises around the globe. 
     
    Video game sales as a whole have continued to grow, now raking in twice as much money per year as the entire film industry, and countless psychologists have turned their attention to the effects gaming has on us: our confidence, our identity, and our personal growth. The Psychology of Zelda applies the latest psychological findings, plus insights from classic psychology theory, to Link, Zelda, Hyrule, and the players who choose to wield the Master Sword. 
     
    In The Psychology of Zelda, psychologists who love the games ask: 
    
    How do Link’s battles in Ocarina of Time against Dark Link, his monstrous doppelganger, mirror the difficulty of confronting our personal demons and the tendency to be our own worst enemies?
    What lessons about pursuing life’s greater meaning can we take away from Link’s quests through Hyrule and beyond the stereotypical video game scenario of rescuing a Princess (Zelda)?
    What do we experience as players when we hear that familiar royal lullaby on the ocarina, Saria’s spirited melody in the Lost Woods, or the iconic main theme on the title screen?
    How do the obstacles throughout Majora’s Mask represent the Five Stages of Grief?
    What can Link’s journey to overcome the loss of the fairy Navi teach us about understanding our own grief and depression?
    Why are we psychologically drawn to the game each and every time a new version becomes available even when they all have a similar storyline? 
    
     
    Think you’ve completed the quest? The Psychology of Zelda gives you new,  thrilling dungeons to explore and even more puzzles to solve.
    Show book