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Ghost Cats of the South - cover

Ghost Cats of the South

Randy Russell

Publisher: Blair

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Summary

Award-winning "ghostlorist" Randy Russell admits to being flummoxed by cats. Some cats will give you whisker kisses or sit with you when you're sick. Others will invite you to rub them, then take a swipe at you, claws out. Some might do any of the above, depending on which way the wind is blowing. Visits from departed pets are easily the most common ghost experiences. And cats refuse to be left out of most anything. Ghost Cats of the South reveals that felines' beloved complexity continues well beyond the grave. In this haunting and entertaining volume, readers will meet the following: A cat smelling of chicken soup that saves a pair of street musicians in Kentuck,, A face-hungry Mississippi cat that inhabits the seats of a vintage 1956 Chevy Bel Air, A porcelain cat that inspires girls at a North Carolina summer camp to reveal cherished secrets, A South Carolina feline that becomes part of a batch of moonshine, A piano-playing cat that fulfills the Thanksgiving wish of a Georgia grocery-store magnate, A soot-covered Louisiana cat whose fiery mission is to enforce a no-smoking ban, A Virginia cat that must get its owner his glasses before his coffin is sealed. Good ghost kitties, bad ghost kitties, ghost kitties in their many manifestations and moods—you'll meet them all in these twenty-two stories that the cats dragged in.

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