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What Now? - 2-Minute Tips for Solving Common Parenting Challenges - cover

What Now? - 2-Minute Tips for Solving Common Parenting Challenges

Rachel Biale

Publisher: Koehler Books

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Summary

“Rachel Biale offers wisdom, clarity and practical suggestions.” 
 — Jill Shugart, MFT, Nursury School Former Director 
  
What Now? 2-Minute Tips for Solving Common Parenting Challenges is an essential guide for today’s parents who are desperate for practical, developmentally-sound advice. Rachel Biale’s guidance builds on over thirty-five years of experience counseling parents of young children. Tips are presented in a lively Q & A format, which will resonate with all parents. 
You will feel like you are sitting with Rachel over a cup of coffee as she offers parenting tips that are straightforward, easy to put into action, and bring fairly quick results. Most importantly, you will feel supported: you are already doing a good job—certainly the best you can; you just need a little help to get out of your immediate conundrum. 

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