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Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong - Reopening the Case of The Hound of the Baskervilles - cover

Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong - Reopening the Case of The Hound of the Baskervilles

Pierre Bayard

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

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Summary

In his brilliant reinvestigation of the classic case of The Hound of the Baskervilles, Pierre Bayard uses the last thoughts of the murder victim as his key to unravel the mystery, leading the reader to the astonishing conclusion that Holmes-and, in fact, Arthur Conan Doyle-got things all wrong. Part intellectual entertainment, part love letter to crime novels, and part crime novel in itself, Sherlock Holmes Was Wrong turns one of our most beloved stories delightfully on its head.

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