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The Coming Age of Imagination - How universal basic income will lead to an explosion of creativity - cover

The Coming Age of Imagination - How universal basic income will lead to an explosion of creativity

Phil Teer

Publisher: Unbound

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Summary

With the very real prospect of increasing automation, Universal Basic Income has become one of the foremost radical ideas of our time.  Phil Teer was a co-founder of the legendary London creative agency, St Luke's, an influential experiment in employee co-ownership and creative working that led Harvard Business Review to call it 'the most frightening company on earth'.For fans of Utopia for Realists by Rutger Bregman, Basic Income: And How We Can Make It Happen by Guy Standing, Basic Income: A Radical Proposal for a Free Society and a Sane Economy by Phillipe Van Parijs and Yannick Vanderborght.

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