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Classical Geopolitics - A New Analytical Model - cover

Classical Geopolitics - A New Analytical Model

Phil Kelly

Publisher: Stanford University Press

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Summary

Geopolitics is the study of how the projection of power (ideological, cultural, economic, or military) is effected and affected by the geographic and political landscape in which it operates. Despite the real world relevance of geopolitics, a common understanding of what classical geopolitics is and how it works still lies beyond the reach of both researchers and practitioners. 
 
In Classical Geopolitics, Phil Kelly attempts to build a common theoretical model, incorporating a host of variables that reflect the complexity of the modern geopolitical stage. He then analyzes thirteen pivotal but widely differing historical events stretching from the Peloponnesian War to World War II, from the fall of the British and Soviet empires to the contemporary diplomacy of South America. Through this analysis, Kelly tests the efficacy of his model as a comprehensive geopolitical analytical tool that can be used across a broad spectrum of geopolitical contexts and events.

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