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Barnsley & District Through Time - cover

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Barnsley & District Through Time

Peter Tuffrey

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

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Summary

The South Yorkshire town of Barnsley first described as 'Berneslai' in the Domesday Book has an illustrious history and has long been associated with the glass-making and coal-mining industries. There are no longer remnants of the previously ever-present Barnsley British Co-operative Society instrumental in aiding the area's growth as a mining community. Much of the town centre was reconstructed in the 1960s and development continues to this day. Some attractive older buildings still survive, demonstrating that not all has changed in Barnsley. Surrounding Barnsley are Bolton on Dearne, Cudworth, Goldthorpe, Elsecar, Penistone and Wombwell, suburban towns and villages that reflect the importance of industry to the area. Peter Tuffrey takes the reader on a fascinating tour of Barnsley and its neighbours, making Barnsley & District Through Time essential reading for anyone who knows and loves this part of South Yorkshire.

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