"There is more treasure in books than in all the pirates' loot on Treasure Island." - Walt Disney
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Lost Tramways: Leeds West - cover

Lost Tramways: Leeds West

Peter Lawler

Publisher: Graffeg

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Lost Tramways of England: Leeds West is the first of two volumes in the series covering the history of trams in the city, from their origins in the late 19th century through to the final routes in November 1959. This volume examines in detail the early history of the tramways, including the horse, steam and pioneering Roundhay electric trams, as well as concentrating on the tramways that served to the western side of the city - such as those to Stanningley, Pudsey, Whingate, Elland Road and Kirkstall Abbey.

The Lost Tramways of England series documents the tram networks which were at the heart of many of England’s growing towns and cities from the mid-19th century to the mid-20th century.

As well as rigorously detailed transport history, these volumes provide an intimate glimpse into life as it was lived during this period, and the recognisable streets which have been maintained or transformed through the decades. An informative, accessible and portable resource for the tram enthusiast as well as the general reader, and a superb souvenir or gift for visitors past and present.

Other books that might interest you

  • On Bicycles - A 200-Year History of Cycling in New York City - cover

    On Bicycles - A 200-Year History...

    Evan Friss

    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
    Subways and yellow taxis may be the icons of New York transportation, but it is the bicycle that has the longest claim to New York’s streets: two hundred years and counting. Never has it taken to the streets without controversy: 1819 was the year of the city’s first bicycle and also its first bicycle ban. Debates around the bicycle’s place in city life have been so persistent not just because of its many uses—recreation, sport, transportation, business—but because of changing conceptions of who cyclists are. In On Bicycles, Evan Friss traces the colorful and fraught history of cycling in New York City. He uncovers the bicycle’s place in the city over time, showing how it has served as a mirror of the city’s changing social, economic, infrastructural, and cultural politics since it first appeared. It has been central, as when horse-drawn carriages shared the road with bicycle lanes in the 1890s; peripheral, when Robert Moses’s car-centric vision made room for bicycles only as recreation; and aggressively marginalized, when Ed Koch’s battle against bike messengers culminated in the short-lived 1987 Midtown Bike Ban. On Bicycles illuminates how the city as we know it today—veined with over a thousand miles of bicycle lanes—reflects a fitful journey powered, and opposed, by New York City’s people and its politics.
    Show book
  • From Dictatorship to Democracy - cover

    From Dictatorship to Democracy

    Gene Sharp

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    From Dictatorship to Democracy, A Conceptual Framework for Liberation is a book-length essay on the generic problem of how to destroy a dictatorship and to prevent the rise of a new one. The book was written in 1993 by Gene Sharp (b. 1928), a professor of political science at the University of Massachusetts. The book has been published in many countries worldwide and translated into more than 30 languages. Editions in many languages are also published by the Albert Einstein Institution of Boston, Massachusetts. This is the Fourth United States Edition, published in May 2010. The book has been circulated worldwide and cited repeatedly as influencing movements such as the Arab Spring of 2010–2012.
    Show book
  • Lingo - Around Europe in Sixty Languages - cover

    Lingo - Around Europe in Sixty...

    Gaston Dorren

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Whether you're a frequent visitor to Europe or just an armchair traveler, the surprising and extraordinary stories in Lingo will forever change the way you think about the continent, and may even make you want to learn a new language.  Lingo spins the reader on a whirlwind tour of sixty European languages and dialects, sharing quirky moments from their histories and exploring their commonalities and differences. Most European languages are descended from a single ancestor, a language not unlike Sanskrit known as Proto-Indo-European (or PIE for short), but the continent's ever-changing borders and cultures have given rise to a linguistic and cultural diversity that is too often forgotten in discussions of Europe as a political entity. Lingo takes us into today's remote mountain villages of Switzerland, where Romansh is still the lingua franca, to formerly Soviet Belarus, a country whose language was Russified by the Bolsheviks, to Sweden, where up until the 1960s polite speaking conventions required that one never use the word you in conversation, leading to tiptoeing questions of the form: Would herr generaldirektr Rexed like a biscuit?  Spanning six millenia and sixty languages in bite-size chapters, Lingo is a hilarious and highly edifying exploration of how Europe speaks.
    Show book
  • At Home in the World - Reflections on Belonging While Wandering the Globe - cover

    At Home in the World -...

    Tsh Oxenreider

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    As Tsh Oxenreider, author of Notes From a Blue Bike, chronicles her family’s adventure around the world—seeing, smelling, and tasting the widely varying cultures along the way—she discovers what it truly means to be at home. 
    In this new memoir, Tsh Oxenreider shares the story of how her family spent a rather ordinary nine months in an extraordinary way: traveling the corners of the earth to see, firsthand, the places they’ve always wanted to explore. She chronicles their global journey from China to Thailand to Australia, Sri Lanka, Uganda, France, Croatia, and beyond, as they fill their days with train schedules, world-schooling the kids, and the gradual awareness of all the world teaches about itself, its inhabitants, and the places we call home. 
    At Home in the World invites readers to travel the globe without the cost of a ticket; to discover the people, places, and stories worth knowing about; to belong in the familiar and yet feel at home outside of it; and to learn how, as the Thai say, that in the end we are all “same same but different.”
    Show book
  • Adult Dyslexia - Tips and Tricks for Beating It - cover

    Adult Dyslexia - Tips and Tricks...

    Anthony Ekanem

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Dyslexia has been described as a difficulty in processing information which may be linked to deficiencies in short-term memory and visual coordination. It is an inherent weakness in short-term memory that is either auditory or visual, which can make it extremely difficult for that person to learn and understand the relation between symbols and spoken sounds.  This difficulty allows the person to be unable to correctly speak the correct flow of auditory sounds needed to make a word or sentence sound proper.
    
    The range and severity of the problem of adult dyslexia varies widely between dyslexic people. The main areas of difficulty that occur most often are reading, writing, spelling, numeric, personal organization and time-keeping. However, the degree to which individuals may be affected ranges from mild spelling difficulties to severe organizational problems or complete illiteracy. In all reality there really is no such thing as a typical case of dyslexia.
    
    In some cases people with dyslexia are unaware that they suffer from such a problem whereas others haven't had a confirmed diagnosis until adulthood. Adult dyslexia is difficult to recognize and identify as it's a problem that many people either don't realize they have or they try to hide it. Simple tasks that a person with dyslexia may try to perform may become increasingly more difficult, such as taking down a message, which can lead to frustration and anxiety.
    Show book
  • Don’t Call Me Mrs Rogers: Love Loathing and Our Epic Drive Around the World - cover

    Don’t Call Me Mrs Rogers: Love...

    Paige Parker

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    At the turn of the millennium, American-born Paige Parker and investment guru Jim Rogers spend three years—1,101 days to be exact—driving over six continents in their "sunburst yellow" coupe and trailer, ultimately setting a Guinness World Record. During the epic journey, Paige's world view is turned upside down, eventually leading her and her family to their ideal home in Singapore. 
     
    On the road trip, she meets women from every walk of life, inspiring monks in China, boy soldiers in Angola and oppressive patriarchy in too many countries, yet she walks away with a profound faith in humankind. She now wants to pass the lessons from the road to her two daughters, to women everywhere and to all intrepid travellers.
    Show book