Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
The Hacienda - How Not to Run a Club - cover

The Hacienda - How Not to Run a Club

Peter Hook

Publisher: It Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

The acclaimed and wildly outlandish inside account of England’s most notorious music club, The Hacienda, from Peter Hook, the New York Times bestselling author of Unknown Pleasures and co-founder of Joy Division and New Order—a story of music, gangsters, drugs, and violence, available for the first time in the United States. 
During the 1980s, The Hacienda would become one of the most famous venues in the history of clubbing—a celebrated cultural watershed alongside Studio 54, CBGBS, and The Whiskey—until its tragic demise. 
Founded by New Order and Factory Records, The Hacienda hosted gigs by such legendary acts as the Stone Roses, the Smiths, Bauhaus, Grandmaster Flash, Run DMC, Kurtis Blow, and Happy Mondays; gave birth to the “Madchester” scene; became the cathedral for acid house; and laid the tracks for rave culture and today’s electronic dance music. But over the course of its fifteen-year run, “Madchester” descended into “Gunchester” as gangs, drugs, greed, and a hostile police force decimated the dream. 
Told in Hook’s uproarious and uncompromising voice, The Hacienda is a funny, horrifying, and outlandish story of success, idealism, naïveté, and greed—of an incredible time and place that would change the face and sound of modern music. 
The Hacienda includes 32 photographs in 16-page four-color insert. 

Who read this book also read:

  • The Mosquito Pocket Manual - All marks in service 1939–45 - cover

    The Mosquito Pocket Manual - All...

    Martin Robson

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The de Havilland DH.98 Mosquito was a British multi-role combat aircraft with a two-man crew that served during and after the Second World War. It was one of few operational front-line aircraft of the era constructed almost entirely of wood and was nicknamed "The Wooden Wonder". The Mosquito was also known affectionately as the "Mossie" to its crews. Originally conceived as an unarmed fast bomber the Mosquito was adapted to a wide range of bombing roles. It was also used by BOAC as a fast transport to carry small high-value cargoes to, and from neutral countries through enemy controlled airspace. 
     
    The book collates a variety of pamphlets and manuals on the plane that were produced throughout the war for the benefit of pilots and others associated with the aircraft.
    Show book
  • Yankee Come Home - On the Road from San Juan Hill to Guantánamo - cover

    Yankee Come Home - On the Road...

    William Craig

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Yankee Come Home explores one family's history in Cuba, and through it, the intense, complex, smoldering relationship between the island nation and its leviathan neighbor. 
     
    In Cuba's most entrancing, storied landscape, William Craig is searching for a history that his family has lost-and now needs to recover. He's looking for the truth about his mysterious great-grandfather, Thomas O'Brien, a self-proclaimed hero of the "splendid little war" who left a legacy of glorious, painful lies. Living a dream that haunts American hearts-the dream of escaping the past, of becoming who we say we are-"Papa" died leaving his own children wondering who he'd really been. 
     
    Along the way, Craig searches for the place where Gilded Age America abandoned republican ideals in favor of imperial ambition-and where his own generation of Americans now preside over arbitrary imprisonment and systematized torture. "I needed to see Guantánamo the way some Americans needed to drive through the night to kneel at JFK's coffin, and others are drawn to Ground Zero," he writes. "Sometimes, we don't know what we've lost until we trace the scars." Traveling with Craig, readers will join in present-day adventures: spirit-possession rituals, black market odysseys, roots-music epiphanies, and discovering the continuing impact of the war in 1898 on both Cuba and America. 
     
    The story of the United States in Cuba is fascinating, but none too flattering. Like the reality of "Papa" O'Brien's identity, it reflects more hubris than heroism, more avarice than sacrifice. In the end, however, Craig's journey in Yankee Come Home is a transformation from disillusionment to redemption.
    Show book
  • Grimms' Fairy Tales - The Original Classic Edition - cover

    Grimms' Fairy Tales - The...

    The Brothers

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    This is a high quality book of the original classic edition. 
    
    This is a freshly published edition of this culturally important work, which is now, at last, again available to you.
    
    Enjoy this classic work. These few paragraphs distill the contents and give you a quick look inside:
     
    
    In the morning came the fox again and met him as he was beginning his journey, and said, Go straight forward, till you come to a castle, before which lie a whole troop of soldiers fast asleep and snoring: take no notice of them, but go into the castle and pass on and on till you come to a room, where the golden bird sits in a wooden cage; close by it stands a beautiful golden cage; but do not try to take the bird out of the shabby cage and put it into the handsome one, otherwise you will repent it. 
    
    ...All went right: then the fox said, When you come to the castle where the bird is, I will stay with the princess at the door, and you will ride in and speak to the king; and when he sees that it is the right horse, he will bring out the bird; but you must sit still, and say that you want to look at it, to see whether it is the true golden bird; and when you get it into your hand, ride away.
    
    
    ...Poor Sultan, who was lying close by them, heard all that the shepherd and his wife said to one another, and was very much frightened to think tomorrow would be his last day; so in the evening he went to his good friend the wolf, who lived in the wood, and told him all his sorrows, and how his master meant to kill him in the morning. 
    
    ...The wolf and the wild boar were first on the ground; and when they espied their enemies coming, and saw the cats long tail standing straight in the air, they thought she was carrying a sword for Sultan to fight with; and every time she limped, they thought she was picking up a stone to throw at them; so they said they should not like this way of fighting, and the boar lay down behind a bush, and the wolf jumped up into a tree. 
    
    ...Everything went right for a week or two, and then Dame Ilsabill said, Husband, there is not near room enough for us in this cottage; the courtyard and the garden are a great deal too small; I should like to have a large stone castle to live in: go to the fish again and tell him to give us a castle.
    Show book
  • The Business of Naming Things - cover

    The Business of Naming Things

    Michael Coffey

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “Riveting . . . vibrant and unsparing.” —Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed review)“Superb. . . . Startlingly original.” —Library Journal (starred review)“Once I started reading these stories, I couldn’t stop. They absorbed me thoroughly, with their taut narratives and evocative language—the language of a poet.” —JAY PARINI, author of Jesus: The Human Face of God and The Last Station“Sherwood Anderson would recognize this world of lonely, longing characters, whose surface lives Coffey tenderly plumbs. These beautiful stories—spare, rich, wise and compelling—go to the heart.” —FREDERIC TUTEN, author of Self Portraits: Fictions and Tintin in the New World“Whether [Coffey is] writing about a sinning priest or a man who’s made a career out of branding or about himself, we can smell Coffey’s protagonists and feel their breath on our cheek. Like Chekhov, he must be a notebook writer; how else to explain the strange quirks and the perfect but unaccountable details that animate these intimate portraits?”  —EDMUND WHITE, author of Inside a Pearl and A Boy’s Own StoryAmong these eight stories, a fan of writer (and fellow adoptee) Harold Brodkey gains an audience with him at his life’s end, two pals take a Joycean sojourn, a man whose business is naming things meets a woman who may not be what she seems, and a father discovers his son is a suspect in an assassination attempt on the president. In each tale, Michael Coffey’s exquisite attention to character underlies the brutally honest perspectives of his disenchanted fathers, damaged sons, and orphans left feeling perpetually disconnected.Michael Coffey is the author of three books of poems and 27 Men Out, a book about baseball’s perfect games. He also co-edited The Irish in America, a book about Irish immigration to America, which was a companion volume to a PBS documentary series. He divides his time between Manhattan and Bolton Landing, New York. The Business of Naming Things is his first work of fiction.
    Show book
  • Introducing Philosophy for Everyday Life - A Practical Guide - cover

    Introducing Philosophy for...

    Trevor Curnow

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    How can we apply philosophy to our everyday lives? Can philosophy affect the way we live? This book will show how philosophy can help to improve your thinking about everyday life. And how, by improving the quality of your thinking, you can improve the quality of your life. It will make you more aware of what you think and why, and how knowing this can help you can change the way you think about your life. Full of practical examples and straightforward advice, and written by an expert in the field, this guide can help you become calmer and happier, and make better decisions.
    Show book
  • How To Deal With A Controlling Person - Getting Out Of An Abusive Relationship - cover

    How To Deal With A Controlling...

    Terence A. Williams

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Dictators aren't just for countries. You can find them in relationships as well. A dictator is someone who decides how everything will be done and fully expects others in his world to abide by his laws. This article outlines 3 signs that you are probably in a dictatorial relationship. This is the most obvious sign, but a dictator makes the rules. No one else is allowed to contribute to the rule-making. If your boyfriend decides all of the rules and expects you to live by them, you are probably dating a dictator. One person in a relationship cannot make all of the rules. That is not the way that a healthy relationship functions. When one person makes all of the rules that the other must live by, that is controlling. If you don't do what your boyfriend tells to you may feel punished. He might ignore you or leave the house altogether and do something enjoyable without you. That is a form of punishing you. He will make sure that you realize you've done something wrong. When someone is as passionate about his rules as he is, you will begin to believe that he's right. It's important that you don't slip into his way of thinking. If he wants to pout and ignore you when you don't do what he wants, let him. Do not let him punish you. Just go about your day as if he's not upset. Another adult who makes you feel bad and tries to punish you in some way is manipulating you. These are all signs of what a woman who has gone through, but there is an answer and that's in How to Deal with a Controlling Person, by Terence A. Williams. Grab your copy today.
    Show book