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Journal of Romanian Studies - Volume 21 (2020) - cover

Journal of Romanian Studies - Volume 21 (2020)

Peter Gross, Diane Vancea, Iuliu Ratiu, Claudia Lonkin

Publisher: ibidem

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Summary

The biannual, peer-reviewed Journal of Romanian Studies, jointly developed by The Society for Romanian Studies and ibidem Press, examines critical issues in Romanian studies, linking work in that field to wider theoretical debates and issues of current relevance, and serving as a forum for junior and senior scholars. The journal also presents articles that connect Romania and Moldova comparatively with other states and their ethnic majorities and minorities, and with other groups by investigating the challenges of migration and globalization and the impact of the European Union.



Issue No. 3 contains:



Alexandra Chiriac: Ephemeral Modernisms, Transnational Lives: Reconstructing Avant-Garde Performance in Bucharest 

Petru Negura: Compulsory Primary Education and State Building in Rural Bessarabia (1918-1940)

Vladimir Solonari: Record Weak: Romanian Judiciary in Occupied Transnistria

Delia Popescu: A Political Palimpsest: Nationalism and Faith in Petre Țuțea’s Thinking

Cynthia M. Horne: What Is too Long and When Is too Late for Transitional Justice? Observations from the Case of Romania

Brindusa Armanca and Peter Gross: Searching for a Future: Mass Media and the Uncertain Construction of Democracy in Romania
Available since: 04/30/2020.
Print length: 200 pages.

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