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30 Days in Sydney - A Wildly Distorted Account - cover

30 Days in Sydney - A Wildly Distorted Account

Peter Carey

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

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Summary

After living abroad for years, novelist Peter Carey returns home to Sydney and attempts to capture its character with the help of his old friends, drawing the reader into a wild and wonderful journey of discovery and rediscovery as bracing as the southerly buster that sometimes batters Sydney's shores. Famous sights such as Bondi Beach, the Opera House, the Harbour Bridge and the Blue Mountains all take on a strange new intensity when exposed to the penetrating gaze of the author and his friends.

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