If you like reading, you will LOVE reading without limits!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
One Part Woman - cover

One Part Woman

Perumal Murugan

Translator Aniruddhan Vasudevan

Publisher: Black Cat

  • 0
  • 11
  • 0

Summary

Perumal Murugan is the star of contemporary Tamil literature, having garnered both critical acclaim and commercial success for his work. One Part Woman sold 100,000 copies in India, and Grove’s edition will be his American debut. One Part Woman deals with questions of gender, caste, and ethnicity, offering a view into South Indian life and society. The novel sparked controversy in India as the plot centers around a festival that celebrates the half-female half-male god Maadhorubaaghan (from whose name the novel gets its title)—on the eighteenth night of the festival, men and women are allowed to sleep with people other than their husbands or wives. The couple’s mothers decide that this might be the solution to their children’s fertility problems. The depiction of this rite (which still goes on in Southern India today) led to calls to ban the book from certain circles, and led to Murugan’s being dubbed “the Tamil Irvine Welsh” by the Guardian. But the Madras High Court upheld Murugan’s right to free speech and he continues to have a very high profile in India, regularly speaking at festivals and commenting on contemporary matters from folklore to politics. The New York Times introduced Murugan to American readers with a glowing profile in summer 2016, declaring him “a major Indian writer . . . neither sentimental nor harsh,” but no work of Murugan’s has ever been published in the United States or UK, only within India. Very few works by contemporary Indian writers, especially those not writing in English, are published in the U.S. and we expect reviewers and booksellers to support this book and writer. Murugan plans to visit the U.S. in connection with the book for select events in New York and elsewhere TBC and will be available for interview. For readers of Ghachar Ghochar and those who enjoyed Kiran Desai’s Hullaballoo in the Guava Orchard or Arundhati Roy’s The God of Small Things, One Part Woman is a powerful portrait of rural, working-class India, an important counterpart to books that explore the urban experience. PEN International recently featured the book as part of its “Read the Resistance” campaign. They will support publication, as will organizations such as the Asian American Writers Workshop. We are approaching authors including Karan Mahajan, Anuk Arudpragasam, Katharine Boo, Min Jin Lee, and Aravind Adiga for blurbs.

Other books that might interest you

  • Macbeth - cover

    Macbeth

    William Shakespeare, SBP Editors

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    Shakespeare's Macbeth is one of the greatest tragic dramas the world has known. Macbeth himself, a brave warrior, is fatally impelled by supernatural forces, by his proud wife, and by his own burgeoning ambition.
    The play is set in Scotland. Returning from battle with his companion Banquo, the nobleman Macbeth meets a group of witches. They predict that Macbeth will first become thane (baron) of Cawdor and then king of Scotland. Urged on by Lady Macbeth, his wife, Macbeth murders King Duncan. But Duncan's sons, Malcolm and Donalbain, escape. Macbeth then seizes the throne of Scotland. But Macbeth has no peace. In a bid to prevent Banquo's descendants from becoming kings according to the witches' prophecy, Macbeth arranges for him to be murdered, along with his son Fleance. Macbeth's men kill Banquo, but Fleance escapes. Haunted by Banquo's ghost, Macbeth seeks counsel from the witches. They tell him to beware of Macduff, another Scottish nobleman. Macbeth is now hardened to killing. He orders the murder of Macduff's wife and children. By contrast, Lady Macbeth, who had encouraged her husband to embark upon his path of slaughter, goes mad with guilt and dies. Macduff's army attacks Macbeth's forces. Macduff meets Macbeth in single combat and kills him. Malcolm, Duncan's son, is then proclaimed king of Scotland. 
    ABOUT THE AUTHOR: 
    William Shakespeare (baptised 26 April 1564) was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the world's pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called England's national poet and the 'Bard of Avon' (or simply "The Bard"). His surviving works consist of 37 plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems. His plays have been translated into every major living language. 
    Shakespeare was born and raised in Stratford-upon-Avon. Scholars believe that he died on his fifty-second birthday, coinciding with St George’s Day. At the age of 18 he married Anne Hathaway, who bore him three children: Susanna, twins Hamnet and Judith. Between 1585 and 1592 he began a successful career in London as an actor, writer, and part owner of the playing company the Lord Chamberlain's Men, later known as the King's Men. He appears to have retired to Stratford around 1613, where he died three years later. 
    Shakespeare produced most of his known work between 1590 and 1613. His early plays were mainly comedies and histories, genres he raised to the peak of sophistication and artistry by the end of the sixteenth century. Next he wrote mainly tragedies until about 1608. He was a respected poet and playwright in his own day, but his reputation did not rise to its present heights until the nineteenth century. The Romantics, in particular, acclaimed Shakespeare's genius, and the Victorians hero-worshipped Shakespeare. In the twentieth century, his work was repeatedly adopted and rediscovered by new movements in scholarship and performance. His plays remain highly popular today and are consistently performed and reinterpreted in diverse cultural and political contexts throughout the world.
    Show book
  • Wonder Boys - cover

    Wonder Boys

    Michael Chabon

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    The “wise, wildly funny story” of a self-destructive writer’s lost weekend by a Pulitzer Prize–winning, New York Times–bestselling author (Chicago Tribune). A wildly successful first novel made Grady Tripp a young star, and seven years later he still hasn’t grown up. He’s now a writing professor in Pittsburgh, plummeting through middle age, stuck with an unfinishable manuscript, an estranged wife, a pregnant girlfriend, and a talented but deeply disturbed student named James Leer. During one lost weekend at a writing festival with Leer and debauched editor Terry Crabtree, Tripp must finally confront the wreckage made of his past decisions. Mordant but humane, Wonder Boys features characters as loveably flawed as any in American fiction. This ebook features a biography of the author.
    Show book
  • How to Knit a Love Song - A Cypress Hollow Yarn Book 1 - cover

    How to Knit a Love Song - A...

    Rachael Herron

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “The perfect book to curl up with, as warm and cozy as your favorite sweater.”—New York Times bestselling author Susan Wiggs Author Rachael Herron spins a delightful yarn in her wonderful debut novel How to Knit a Love Song. The first in her Cypress Hollow Yarn series of smart, witty, and wonderful love stories woven around a knitting theme, How to Knit a Love Song is a delightful indulgence certain to charm every reader who loved The Friday Night Knitting Club, as well as devoted fans of the heartwarming fiction of Debbie Macomber, Sheryl Woods, and Susan Wiggs.
    Show book
  • Sissy Landlord - Dominated and Forced Feminised by his Young Tenant & Her Friends - cover

    Sissy Landlord - Dominated and...

    Anonymous

    • 1
    • 6
    • 0
    He should never have gone into Kerry’s bedroom; but curiosity got the better of him. A weakness that had cost him dearly.
     
    When a young and elegant female colleague comes to rent a room in his flat, Stephen Williamson can’t wait to rummage through her lingerie and try them on. Kerry Carfax is oblivious to the fact her landlord secretly dresses in his tenants’ panties and bra and is unaware he is a closet sissy with fantasies of being humiliated by young, sexy women. His obsession extends to a spying on a long back catalogue of female tenants but he has never taken the plunge to ask any of them out or even to consider confessing his proclivities of cross-dressing or female BDSM. Will Stephen take the leap and realise his deep fantasies could become a reality in the presence of this young strong-willed woman and her friends? Will he ask her to be his Sissy Mistress or will he return to his life of watching and fantasising? Possibly he may have no choice. Read ‘Sissy Landlord’ and find out, now.
     
    A story of young domme female superiority, blackmail and forced feminisation approximately 6000 words long.
    Show book
  • The King's Witch - Frances Gorges historical trilogy Book I - cover

    The King's Witch - Frances...

    Tracy Borman

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    Borman’s latest book, The Private Lives of the Tudors, was a New York Times Book Review Editors’ Choice and published in hardcover to strong sales and favorable reviews, cited as an “authoritative work” (New York Times Book Review) and “riveting history” (O, The Oprah Magazine). The book was the basis for a multi-part documentary series, hosted by Borman, which aired on British television in June 2016.
    Americans continue to be fascinated by the Tudors, from the Showtime dramatic series to Philippa Gregory and Hilary Mantel’s novels (and their TV and stage adaptations). The King’s Witch will appeal to readers of Mantel’s Wolf Hall and Bring Up the Bodies, Alison Weir’s Six Tudor Queens series, and Gregory’s The Last Tudor.
    HBO is producing a three-part mini-series entitled Gunpowder that focuses on the Gunpowder Plot of 1605, which is also the culmination of Borman’s novel. The adaptation is premiering in December 2017 in the U.S. and includes many of the real-life characters also seen in The King’s Witch, such as Robert Catesby, King James I, and Guy Fawkes. 
    Borman is the joint Chief Curator of Historic Royal Palaces in the UK, working daily in the palaces that formed the private world of the Tudors.
    Show book
  • At the Jerusalem - cover

    At the Jerusalem

    Paul Bailey

    • 2
    • 7
    • 1
    'A very funny book, but never jeering, full of pity, but unsentimentally harsh with the tragedy of old age which institutional kindness cannot cushion' Financial Times. 
     
    Following the death from leukaemia of her daughter, Celia, Mrs Gadny goes to live with her sullen stepson Henry. But she finds little affection or contentment either with him, or with his selfish wife Thelma, or with their ungrateful children. She is sent to an old people's home, 'The Jerusalem', a converted workhouse, green-and-white-tiled. Mrs Gadny is repulsed and humiliated by the home and its inmates: women like acid-tongued Miss Trimmer, the vulgar toothless Mrs Affery, and Mrs O'Blath with her hysterical laughter. Retreating from the kindness offered her by the nurses and the friendly Mrs Capes, she withdraws into her memories, but even their fragmented recollection provides small comfort. Mrs Gadny's only escape from 'The Jerusalem' lies in her own crumbling consciousness. 
     
    Paul Bailey is sensitive to the exact nuance of conversation, the precise detail that can create an environment or a mood, and draw the reader into it. His book is an exquisitely defined miniature whose impression will not easily be forgotten. 
     
    With an introduction by Colm Tóibín.
    Show book