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The Beach at Doonshean - cover

The Beach at Doonshean

Penny Feeny

Publisher: Aria

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Summary

In Ireland, the past never dies... 
 
Long ago, on a windswept Irish beach, a young father died saving the life of another man's child. 
 
Thirty years later, his widow, Julia, decides to return to this wild corner of Ireland to lay the past to rest. Her journey sparks others: her daughter Bel, an artist, joins her mother in Ireland, while son Matt and daughter-in-law Rachel, at home in Liverpool, embark on some soul-searching of their own. 
 
As the threads of past and present intertwine, Julia's family confront long-buried feelings of guilt, anger, fear and desire. Only then can they allow the crashing waves of the beach at Doonshean to bond them together once again. 
 
This is a grown-up, thoughtful family drama for fans of Maeve Binchy and Patricia Scanlan.

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