Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Dead in the Water - My Forty-Year Search for My Brother's Killer - cover

Dead in the Water - My Forty-Year Search for My Brother's Killer

Penny Farmer

Publisher: Diversion Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

An “intimate” account of a double murder by a man once suspected as being the Golden State Killer (O, the Oprah Magazine,“20 Best True Crime Books”).   In 1978, two tortured corpses—hooded, bound, and weighted down with engine parts—were found in the sea off Guatemala. Junior doctor Chris Farmer and his girlfriend, Peta Frampton, were still clinging to life when they were thrown from the yacht they’d been crewing.   Here is the gripping account of how Chris’s family worked alongside police, the FBI, and Interpol to gather evidence against the boat’s Californian skipper, Silas Duane Boston. Almost four decades later, in 2015, Chris’s sister, Penny, used Facebook to track down Boston. Following the detailed, haunting testimony of his own two sons—who also implicated their father in a string of other killings—Boston was finally arrested and charged with two counts of maritime murder.   A story of homicide on the high seas, Dead in the Water is also a tale of a family’s fortitude and diligence in tracking down a monster.   “A real-life page turner more intriguing than anything on Netflix.”—Mail on Sunday   “A heartbreaking tale of familial love and a sister’s hunt for justice. There are numerous twists and turns which would be disturbing if they were woven between the pages of a novel let alone as part of a true story.”—The Tattooed Book
Available since: 04/02/2019.
Print length: 265 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Do Serial Killers Have Superegos? - cover

    Do Serial Killers Have Superegos?

    J.M. Kuczynski

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Serial killers do have conscience. It isn’t that they lack conscience. It is that their consciences lack some of the capabilities that an ordinary person’s conscience. The serial killer’s conscience does exist, as is evidenced by his ability to self-regulate—and indeed to self-regulate quite as well, at least in most contexts, as the next person. But the serial killer’s conscience is not morally articulated; it lacks, at most, the ability to impose moral strictures on the serial killer’s thought and conduct. But even this it does not entirely lack, given that serial killers are, in certain respects, not entirely without morality.An Author's Republic audio production.
    Show book
  • Jack the Ripper & the London Press - cover

    Jack the Ripper & the London Press

    L. Perry Curtis

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Breaks new ground in its examination of the role of newspaper reporting during the police hunt for the first notorious serial killer.”—Reviews in History   Press coverage of the 1888 mutilation murders attributed to Jack the Ripper was of necessity filled with gaps and silences, for the killer remained unknown and Victorian journalists had little experience reporting serial murders and sex crimes. This engrossing book examines how fourteen London newspapers—dailies and weeklies, highbrow and lowbrow—presented the Ripper news, in the process revealing much about the social, political, and sexual anxieties of late Victorian Britain and the role of journalists in reinforcing social norms.   L. Perry Curtis surveys the mass newspaper culture of the era, delving into the nature of sensationalism and the conventions of domestic murder news. Analyzing the fourteen newspapers—two of which emanated from the East End, where the murders took place—he shows how journalists played on the fears of readers about law and order by dwelling on lethal violence rather than sex, offering gruesome details about knife injuries but often withholding some of the more intimate details of the pelvic mutilations. He also considers how the Ripper news affected public perceptions of social conditions in Whitechapel.   “The apparently motiveless violence of the Whitechapel killings denied journalists a structure, and it is the resulting creativity in news reporting that L Perry Curtis Jr describes. His impressive book makes a genuine contribution to 19th-century history in a way that books addressing the banal question of the identity of the Ripper do not.”—The Guardian
    Show book
  • Ma Barker and the Barker-Karpis Gang: The Controversial History of the Criminal Gang during the Great Depression - cover

    Ma Barker and the Barker-Karpis...

    Charles River Editors

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Among America’s most infamous “Public Enemies,” perhaps the most unique and controversial was Kate Barker. With her prominent, hawk-tipped nose and plump, doughy face, framed by a classic dark curly coif and frilly day dresses to match, Ma Barker was as non-threatening as they come. Nary a second glance was given to this grandmotherly figure by those who crossed her path, perhaps at most a polite tip of the hat. Of course, as the age-old adage goes, appearances are often deceiving. According to the FBI and portrayals in popular culture, not only was Ma Barker a crass, greedy, and highly manipulative individual who coaxed her sons into the abyss-like vortex of criminality, she was the matriarchal mastermind of one of the most notorious gangs of the Dirty Thirties era.  
    	The Ma Barker Gang, as they were so branded, wasn't a typical band of small-time crooks. Quite the contrary, the unorthodox family-run enterprise was, as described by FBI Director J. Edgar Hoover, “the most vicious, cold-blooded crew of murderers, kidnappers, and robbers in recent memory.” The gang was as accomplished – and dangerous – as it was elusive, and between 1930 and 1933 alone, they made off with an estimated $3 million. In their heyday, the gang boasted some 25 members, and through it all, the Barker boys remained its core members. Blood, as per the Barker code, would always be thicker than water. 
    The obvious novelty of the alleged gang leader's identity aside, the disturbing fates of the Barker brothers and many of their associates served as a cautionary tale about the dangers and delusions that ensue when one becomes consumed by unbridled avarice and arrogance. But why were the Barker brothers, once innocent young lads, steered so far off the path of righteousness? What was the true depth of Ma's involvement in the gang's laundry list of despicable crimes? How did the once untouchable gang's winning streak culminate in such catastrophic disaster? 
    Show book
  • Operation Devil Horns - The Takedown of MS-13 in San Francisco - cover

    Operation Devil Horns - The...

    Michael Santini, Ray Bolger

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In a bid to take down MS-13's criminal network in the Mission District of San Francisco, Michael Santini, a special agent with Homeland Security Investigations, recruits a pair of hardened gang members and convinces them to risk their lives as criminal informants. Set in a city with one of the strictest sanctuary policies protecting illegal immigrants in America, Operation Devil Horns illustrates how politically correct ideology impacts life-or-death crime fighting on the streets.Through the informants' eyes, Operation Devil Horns offers a rare glimpse into the pervasive criminal subculture of MS-13, a gang of Spanish-speaking immigrants that still terrorizes pockets of American society today — including their own compatriots.The case begins with a focus on the gang in San Francisco, eventually widening to include a network that reaches across borders. Santini tracks down the gang's leadership from the Bay Area to the prison cells of corrupt Central American regimes. Eventually, it takes the cold-blooded murder of three family members in San Francisco to shake the American public out of complacency and focus sober attention on a growing and violent threat.
    Show book
  • The Girl on the Stairs - The Search for a Missing Witness to the JFK Assassination - cover

    The Girl on the Stairs - The...

    Barry Ernest

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    One man’s quest to investigate a dismissed eyewitness account of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. 
     
    Victoria Elizabeth Adams worked on the fourth floor of the Texas School Book Depository in 1963. She was on the back staircase of the building at the precise moment that Lee Harvey Oswald—according to the Warren Commission’s account—was making his escape. Yet, Adams saw and heard no one. 
     
    This is the story—both frightening and fascinating—about a journey to seek the truth in the assassination of President John F. Kennedy. After a three-decade quest and an array of obstacles, investigative journalist Barry Ernest brings the full account of the girl on the stairs to life. 
     
    Ernest, a frequent lecturer on the topic of the Kennedy assassination, won the 2011 Mary Ferrell Pioneer Award, a national honor presented for a lifetime of searching for the truth. 
     
    David S. Lifton, author of the New York Times bestseller Best Evidence: Disguise and Deception in the Assassination of John F. Kennedy, provides a foreword to this intriguing saga. 
     
    Praise for The Girl on the Stairs 
     
    “Beautifully paced writing takes the reader along as Ernst searches for crucial information. . . . Highly recommended.” —Debra Conway, president, JFK Lancer Productions & Publications, Inc. 
     
    “Ernest demonstrates there are still important lessons to learned and good historical research to be done.” —Larry Hancock, author of Someone Would Have Talked: The Assassination of President John F. Kennedy 
     
    “Brilliant, utterly compelling, very, very dark, and deeply troubling.” —Dr. Stephen Dorril, author of MI6:Fifty Years of Special Operations 
     
    “Deserves space on the shelf of every Kennedy assassination buff in the country.” —Maj. Glenn MacDonald, Military Corruption 
     
    “Totally engrossing and fascinating.” —Terry West, WAXX FM
    Show book
  • Jukebox Empire - The Mob and the Dark Side of the American Dream - cover

    Jukebox Empire - The Mob and the...

    David Rabinovitch

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    An aspiring tycoon partners with a racketeer to build a jukebox that makes millions, then takes the fall for the largest money laundering scheme in history.Caught between the Mob and the feds in a plot to save the casinos in Havana from Castro's revolution, Wolfe Rabin pulls the biggest money-laundering scheme in history, but his hubris leads to the conspiracy unraveling in a sensational trial. At a time when there was a jukebox in every restaurant, diner, bar, barracks, arcade, and canteen, Rabin's trajectory from inventor to promoter to outlaw is set against the Mob's growing infiltration of the jukebox industry. In a world of music, machines, and money, popular culture and organized crime collide in an epic drama of invention and greed. David Rabinovitch's investigation into his own family history pieces together an epic puzzle that begins in Chicago with the invention of a jukebox and spans the casinos of Havana and the financial giants of Europe, leading to what the FBI called "the biggest bank robbery in the world."
    Show book