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The Living Reed - A Novel of Korea - cover

The Living Reed - A Novel of Korea

Pearl S. Buck

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

An “absorbing and fast-moving” saga of Korea as experienced by one unforgettable family, from the Nobel Prize–winning author of The Good Earth (The New York Times).  “The year was 4214 after Tangun of Korea, and 1881 after Jesus of Judea.” So begins Pearl S. Buck’s The Living Reed, an epic historical novel seen through the eyes of four generations of Korean aristocracy.   As the chronicle begins, the Kims are living comfortably as advisors to the Korean royal family. But that world is torn apart with the Japanese invasion, when the queen is killed and the Kims are thrust into hiding. Through their story, Buck traces the country’s journey from the late nineteenth century through the end of the Second World War.   “The Korean people come hauntingly alive,” wrote the Journal of Asian Studies about The Living Reed. “The remarkable novels of Pearl S. Buck have given the world an awakened understanding and appreciation of the Chinese people, and now she has wrought a like marvel for Korea.” A New York Times bestseller, The Living Reed is an enlightening account of a nation’s fight for survival and a gripping tale of a family caught in the ebb and flow of history.  This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate.

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