What's better than reading? Reading withour limits :D
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Portrait of a Marriage - A Novel - cover

Portrait of a Marriage - A Novel

Pearl S. Buck

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 4
  • 0

Summary

A wealthy painter falls in love with an illiterate Pennsylvania farm girl in this novel from the New York Times–bestselling author of The Good Earth.  At the turn of the century, an upper-class painter from Philadelphia goes searching for inspiration. He finds his muse on a farm—the farmer’s beautiful and humble daughter. His portrait of her becomes one of his most inspired works, but his passion for the illiterate girl doesn’t stop at the easel: He returns to marry her and settle down to country life—a journey that means bridging enormous gaps between their cultures, breaking from his parents, and creating tension between their friends. Pearl S. Buck compassionately imagines both sides of the complex marriage, and in addition, creates a wonderfully vivid picture of America leading up to the Second World War. This ebook features an illustrated biography of Pearl S. Buck including rare images from the author’s estate.

Other books that might interest you

  • Birdcage Walk - cover

    Birdcage Walk

    Helen Dunmore

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Set in the late 1700s, the novel follows a pivotal time in British Romantic-era history and Radicalism, influenced by the French Revolution (which occurred at the same time)
    
    
    
    Raised by political activists, Dunmore’s protagonist Lizzie, like Austen’s infamous heroines Elizabeth Bennet and Emma Woodhouse,  is a free spirited woman ahead of her time, who refuses to conform to the social mores expected of a woman of her class and marriage
    
    
    
    An incisive portrait of not just an important era in world history, but also of a marriage between a strong, independent woman and a controlling man whose ambition and hubris have disastrous outcomes. As always, Dunmore brilliantly examines the historical through an intimate, personal lens
    
    
    
    The novel will appeal not just to avid readers of Helen’s work but also to fans of literature of the romantics, as well as fans of literary domestic thrillers 
    
    
    
    The first ever winner of the Orange Proze (now the Bailey's Prize) Dunmore’s historical novels have earned her comparisons to Leo Tolstoy, Virginia Woolf, and Emily Brontë
    
    
    
    Exposure was a Kirkus Reviews Best Book of 2016 and garnered rave reviews in the New York Times Book Review, EW, and the New Yorker, among others
    
    
    
    The Siege was a New York Times “Summer Reading” title, and was shortlisted for the Whitbread Novel Award and the Orange Prize
    Show book
  • Slave Old Man - A Novel - cover

    Slave Old Man - A Novel

    Patrick Chamoiseau

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    The “heart-stopping” (The Millions), “richly layered” (Brooklyn Rail), “haunting, beautiful” (BuzzFeed) story of an escaped slave and the killer hound that pursues him
     
    Shortlisted for the National Book Critics Circle Award for Fiction, Patrick Chamoiseau’s Slave Old Man was published to accolades in hardcover in a brilliant translation by Linda Coverdale, winning the French-American Foundation Translation Prize and chosen as a Publishers Weekly Best Book of 2018.
     
    Slave Old Man is a gripping, profoundly unsettling story of an elderly slave’s daring escape into the wild from a plantation in Martinique, with his master and a fearsome hound on his heels. We follow them into a lush rain forest where nature is beyond all human control: sinister, yet entrancing and even exhilarating, because the old man’s flight to freedom will transform them all in truly astonishing—even otherworldly—ways, as the overwhelming physical presence of the forest reshapes reality and time itself.
     
    Chamoiseau’s exquisitely rendered new novel is an adventure for all time, one that fearlessly portrays the demonic cruelties of the slave trade and its human costs in vivid, sometimes hallucinatory prose. Offering a loving and mischievous tribute to the Creole culture of early nineteenth-century Martinique, this novel takes us on a unique and moving journey into the heart of Caribbean history.
     
     
    Show book
  • The Secret Battle - cover

    The Secret Battle

    A. P. Herbert

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    'The Secret Battle should be read in each generation, so that men and women may rest under no illusion about what war means, a soldier's tale cut in stone to melt all hearts' - Sir Winston Churchill.  
     
    AP Herbert's The Secret Battle is one of the classic works of World War One fiction, praised by everyone from Churchill, to Arnold Bennett, to Field Marshall Bernard Montgomery.  
     
    The Secret Battle draws upon A P Herbert's own experiences as a junior infantry officer in the First World War. It tells the tragic tale of an idealistic young officer, Harry Penrose.  
     
    First in Gallipoli, then in the trenches of France, he is tested and brought to breaking point as he struggles to retain the ideals of military duty and courage amidst the daily miseries of the trenches. This narrative lays bare the real horrors of the First World War without melodrama or sensationalism. The author tells his story not with indignant protest, but with a sad resignation that makes this a haunting and deeply moving book. 
     
    More than ninety years after its first publication, the work has lost none of its freshness, relevance and poignancy. It remains an incredibly touching story of what might happen to a gallant soldier borne down by the stresses of war. And it raises important questions as to what constitutes courage, and the justice of executions in the First World War, still an open matter of debate and contention in the new century. 
     
    The Secret Battle includes a foreword by Sir Winston Churchill. 
     
      
    Praise for The Secret Battle 
     
    'The best story of front-line war I have read' - Field Marshall Montgomery.  
     
    'Mr Herbert's story of the brave officer who is shot for cowardice belongs to the highest class of British war fiction. It is a little masterpiece' - Cyril Falls.  
     
    'Written with classic restraint and something of classic beauty' - Arnold Bennett.  
     
    Sir Alan Patrick Herbert was an English humourist, novelist, playwright and law reform activist. He was an independent Member of Parliament (MP) for Oxford University for 15 years, five of which he combined with service in the Royal Navy.
    Show book
  • This Shall Be a House of Peace - cover

    This Shall Be a House of Peace

    Phil Halton

    • 3
    • 12
    • 1
    After the collapse of Afghanistan’s Soviet-backed government, a mullah finds himself doing anything to protect his students. 
     
    
    
    Chaos reigns in the wake of the collapse of Afghanistan's Soviet-backed government. In the rural, warlord-ruled south, a student is badly beaten at a checkpoint run by bandits. His teacher, who leads a madrassa for orphans left behind by Afghanistan’s civil war, leads his students back to the checkpoint and forces the bandits out. His actions set in motion a chain of events that will change the balance of power in his country and send shock waves through history.
    
    Amid villagers seeking protection and warlords seeking power, the Mullah's influence grows. Against the backdrop of anarchy dominated by armed factions, he devotes himself to building a house of peace with his students — or, as they are called in Pashto, taliban. Part intrigue, part war narrative, and part historical drama, This Shall Be a House of Peace charts their breathtaking ambition, transformation, and rise to power.
    Show book
  • The Dying of the Light - A Novel - cover

    The Dying of the Light - A Novel

    Robert Goolrick

    • 2
    • 4
    • 0
    From the author of the bestselling A Reliable Wife comes a dramatic, passionate tale of a glamorous Southern debutante who marries for money and ultimately suffers for love—a southern gothic as written by Dominick Dunne. 
    It begins with a house and ends in ashes . . . 
    Diana Cooke was "born with the century" and came of age just after World War I. The daughter of Virginia gentry, she knew early that her parents had only one asset, besides her famous beauty: their stately house, Saratoga, the largest in the commonwealth, which has hosted the crème of society and Hollywood royalty. Though they are land-rich, the Cookes do not have the means to sustain the estate. Without a wealthy husband, Diana will lose the mansion that has been the heart and soul of her family for five generations. 
    The mysterious Captain Copperton is an outsider with no bloodline but plenty of cash. Seeing the ravishing nineteen-year-old Diana for the first time, he’s determined to have her. Diana knows that marrying him would make the Cookes solvent and ensure that Saratoga will always be theirs. Yet Copperton is cruel as well as vulgar; while she admires his money, she cannot abide him. Carrying the weight of Saratoga and generations of Cookes on her shoulders, she ultimately succumbs to duty, sacrificing everything, including love. 
    Luckily for Diana, fate intervenes. Her union with Copperton is brief and gives her a son she adores. But when her handsome, charming Ashton, now grown, returns to Saratoga with his college roommate, the real scandal and tragedy begins. 
    Reveling in the secrets, mores, and society of twentieth-century genteel Southern life, The Dying of the Light is a romance, a melodrama, and a cautionary tale told with the grandeur and sweep of an epic Hollywood classic.
    Show book
  • Savage Liberty - A Mystery of Revolutionary America - cover

    Savage Liberty - A Mystery of...

    Eliot Pattison

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    "Pattison has few peers when it comes to integrating historical events into a complex but plausible whodunit plot." —Publishers Weekly (starred and boxed review) When a ship arriving from London explodes in Boston Harbor, both the peace of the colonial city and Duncan McCallum's life are shattered. Summoned by his new friend John Hancock to a beach awash with the bodies of the victims, Duncan discovers that the ship was deliberately sabotaged, apparently to cover the theft by French agents provocateurs of a secret document being carried to the Sons of Liberty. Hancock refuses to let him take his evidence to the authorities, for this is 1768 and relations with the government are so sour that officials are being hanged in effigy. Fearing that the intrigues of Hancock and the Sons might set the colonies ablaze, Duncan relentlessly pursues the truth, only to be falsely charged with treason and murder. To escape the hangman's noose and restore his honor, Duncan has no choice but to follow a northbound trail of violence and deception while being relentlessly hounded by bountymen and vengeful soldiers. With the help of unexpected new friends, including Ethan Allen, aged natives, and outlawed Jesuits, he survives scalp hunters, imprisonment, and his own spiritual crisis, only to realize he cannot resolve the terrible crimes until he first understands the emerging truths about freedom in the American colonies.
    Show book