Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Walking D-Day - cover

Walking D-Day

Paul Reed

Publisher: Pen & Sword Military

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

This WWII battlefield guide offers twelve walking tours covering all the major sites of the D-Day landings in Normandy with in-depth historical context. 
 
D-Day the momentous first step in the Allied liberation of France and the rest of northwest Europe. The places associated with the Normandy landings are among the most memorable that a battlefield visitor can explore. In Walking D-Day, military historian Paul Reed takes visitors through all the major sites, from Pegasus Bridge, Merville Battery, Ouistrehem and Longues Battery to Juno, Gold, Omaha and Utah Beaches, Pointe du Hoc and Sainte-Mre-glise.  
 
Each of the twelve walks includes a vividly detailed historical introduction. Information on the many battlefield monuments and the military cemeteries is included, and there are over 120 illustrations. Walking D-Day introduces the visitor not only to the places where the Allies landed and first clashed with the Germans defenders but also to the Normandy landscape over which the critical battles that decided the course of the war were fought.
Available since: 08/19/2012.
Print length: 240 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Grains of Gold - Tales of a Cosmopolitan Traveler - cover

    Grains of Gold - Tales of a...

    Gendun Chopel

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “Translated with grace and precision . . . gives us a rare glimpse of how Asian religion and life appeared from the perspective of the Tibetan plateau.” —Janet Gyatso, Harvard University 
     
    In 1941, philosopher and poet Gendun Chopel sent a manuscript by ship, train, and yak across mountains and deserts to his homeland in Tibet. He would follow it five years later, returning to his native land after twelve years in India and Sri Lanka. But he did not receive the welcome he imagined: he was arrested by the government of the regent of the young Dalai Lama on trumped-up charges of treason. He emerged from prison three years later a broken man and died soon after. Gendun Chopel was a prolific writer, yet he considered that manuscript, to be his life’s work, one to delight his compatriots with tales of an ancient Indian and Tibetan past, Now available for the first time in English, Grains of Gold is a unique compendium of South Asian and Tibetan culture that combines travelogue, drawings, history, and ethnography. Chopel describes the world he discovered in South Asia, from the ruins of the sacred sites of Buddhism to the Sanskrit classics he learned to read in the original. He is also sharply, often humorously critical of the Tibetan love of the fantastic, bursting one myth after another and finding fault with the accounts of earlier Tibetan pilgrims. The work of an extraordinary scholar, Grains of Gold is a compelling work animated by a sense of discovery of both a distant past and a strange present. 
     
    “The magnum opus of arguably the single most brilliant Tibetan scholar of the twentieth century.” —Lauran Hartley, Columbia University
    Show book
  • Needlefelting - cover

    Needlefelting

    Michelle Hickman

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    This practical guide explains how to needlefelt and make wonderful creations at your kitchen table with few specialist tools. The craft requires no sewing or needlework skills so is easy for beginners to try but has no limits for more experienced makers. Packed with inspiration, this beautiful book shows you the way and encourages you to create your own sculptures (large or small) and to experiment with your ideas.
    Show book
  • Magical Forest Fairy Crafts Through the Seasons - Make 25 Enchanting Forest Fairies Gnomes & More from Simple Supplies - cover

    Magical Forest Fairy Crafts...

    Lenka Vodicka-Paredes, Asia Currie

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    25 seasonal, toymaking project for kids, including faeries, gnomes, animals, and more, from the authors of Forest Fairy Crafts. 
     
    Share the magic of sewing with everyone you meet! The best-selling authors behind Forest Fairy Crafts are back with all-new projects approved by crafty kids. Sew a forest of delightful felt fairies, gnomes, and decorations from simple supplies, using new skills such as embroidery. The illustrated guide teaches you how to stitch patterns and personalize these charming characters and toys through the seasons—summer, spring, fall, and winter. (Plus get tips for adult helpers on how to help kids craft!) Great for children’s parties, classrooms, and other groups, these crafts appeal to boys, girls, and the young at heart!   
     
    • Felt, beads, and imagination! Sew over 25 fairyland projects from everyday supplies you have on hand 
     
    • Craft fairies, gnomes, and forest friends with kid-tested patterns carefully developed by two teachers 
     
    • Embellish your little friends with colorful threads, yarn, buttons, and sequins  
     
    • Decorate your home, play with handcrafted toys, and celebrate every season
    Show book
  • A History of English Place Names and Where They Came From - cover

    A History of English Place Names...

    John Moss

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    An enlightening journey into the languages, meanings, and history behind the names on England’s map.   The origins of the names of many English towns, hamlets, and villages date as far back as Saxon times, when kings like Alfred the Great established fortified borough towns to defend against the Danes. A number of settlements were established and named by French Normans following the Conquest. Many are even older and are derived from Roman place names. Some hark back to the Vikings who invaded and established settlements in the eighth and ninth centuries.   Most began as simple descriptions of the location; some identified its founder, marked territorial limits, or gave tribal people a sense of their place in the grand scheme of things. Whatever their derivation, place names are inextricably bound up in history—and these are the stories behind them.
    Show book
  • The Word of an Engineer - cover

    The Word of an Engineer

    James Weldon Johnson

    • 1
    • 0
    • 0
    James Weldon Johnson was an American author, educator, lawyer, diplomat, songwriter, and civil rights activist. Johnson is best remembered for his leadership within the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), where he started working in 1917, being chosen as the first black executive secretary of the organization, effectively the operating officer. He was first known for his writing, which includes poems, novels, and anthologies collecting both poems and spirituals of black culture. (Summary from Wikipedia)
    Show book
  • Botticelli - cover

    Botticelli

    Victoria Charles, Emile Gebhart

    • 1
    • 4
    • 0
    He was the son of a citizen in comfortable circumstances, and had been, in Vasari’s words, “instructed in all such things as children are usually taught before they choose a calling.” However, he refused to give his attention to reading, writing and accounts, continues Vasari, so that his father, despairing of his ever becoming a scholar, apprenticed him to the goldsmith Botticello: whence came the name by which the world remembers him. However, Sandro, a stubborn-featured youth with large, quietly searching eyes and a shock of yellow hair – he has left a portrait of himself on the right-hand side of his picture of the Adoration of the Magi – would also become a painter, and to that end was placed with the Carmelite monk Fra Filippo Lippi. But he was a realist, as the artists of his day had become, satisfied with the joy and skill of painting, and with the study of the beauty and character of the human subject instead of religious themes. Botticelli made rapid progress, loved his master, and later on extended his love to his master’s son, Filippino Lippi, and taught him to paint, but the master’s realism scarcely touched Lippi, for Botticelli was a dreamer and a poet. 
        Botticelli is a painter not of facts, but of ideas, and his pictures are not so much a representation of certain objects as a pattern of forms. Nor is his colouring rich and lifelike; it is subordinated to form, and often rather a tinting than actual colour. In fact, he was interested in the abstract possibilities of his art rather than in the concrete. For example, his compositions, as has just been said, are a pattern of forms; his figures do not actually occupy well-defined places in a well-defined area of space; they do not attract us by their suggestion of bulk, but as shapes of form, suggesting rather a flat pattern of decoration. Accordingly, the lines which enclose the figures are chosen with the primary intention of being decorative. 
        It has been said that Botticelli, “though one of the worst anatomists, was one of the greatest draughtsmen of the Renaissance.” As an example of false anatomy we may notice the impossible way in which the Madonna’s head is attached to the neck, and other instances of faulty articulation and incorrect form of limbs may be found in Botticelli’s pictures. Yet he is recognised as one of the greatest draughtsmen: he gave to ‘line’ not only intrinsic beauty, but also significance. In mathematical language, he resolved the movement of the figure into its factors, its simplest forms of expression, and then combined these various forms into a pattern which, by its rhythmical and harmonious lines, produces an effect upon our imagination, corresponding to the sentiments of grave and tender poetry that filled the artist himself.
        This power of making every line count in both significance and beauty distinguishes the great master- draughtsmen from the vast majority of artists who used line mainly as a necessary means of representing concrete objects.
    Show book