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Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1 - Indiana Road Trip Travel Guide Series #1 - cover

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Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1 - Indiana Road Trip Travel Guide Series #1

Paul R. Wonning

Publisher: Mossy Feet Books

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Summary

Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1 is a guidebook that includes short, one day road trips that Hoosiers can enjoy in Indiana. This small atlas of tourism destinations provides information on thirteen travel destinations in the Hoosier state. State parks, local parks, museums and wildlife refuges all make interesting places to explore. This guide will help you find good day trip destinations for you to visit and enjoy. Short Indiana Road Trips - Volume 1 includes basic information fort these destinations and provides contact information for interested visitors to find out more.

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