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A History of Time - History of Things Series #7 - cover

A History of Time - History of Things Series #7

Paul R. Wonning

Publisher: Mossy Feet Books

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Summary

Discover the fascinating history of time, clocks, calendars and time zones. A History of Time reveals the journal of the development of how humans keep track of time, including daylight saving time.

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