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Lenin and the Revolutionary Party - cover

Lenin and the Revolutionary Party

Paul Leblanc

Publisher: Haymarket Books

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Summary

Reviews scholarship and controversies on Lenin's thoughts on political organizationExplores relevance of Lenin's ideas for the twenty-first centuryClearly written, sympathetic yet balances, fully documented

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