"There is more treasure in books than in all the pirates' loot on Treasure Island." - Walt Disney
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Revolutionary Studies - Theory History People - cover

Revolutionary Studies - Theory History People

Paul Le Blanc

Publisher: Haymarket Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Argues for the centrality of Marxism to emancipatory politics through an exploration of core theoretical insights around themes including class and identity, democracy, and development. Explores the experiences of five historical revolutions (Russia, Cuba, Nicaragua, India, South Africa) and the ideas of five well-known Marxist figures (Georg Lukács, Antonio Gramsci, James Burnham, Dennis Brutus, and Daniel Bensaïd). Re-asserts Marxist thought and practice as a tradition of oppressed and exploited people the world over. Demonstrates the power and insights of Marxist theory in analysing twentieth-century revolutionary movements, and its continuing relevance for contemporary political struggle.

Other books that might interest you

  • Unequal Coverage - The Experience of Health Care Reform in the United States - cover

    Unequal Coverage - The...

    Heide Castañeda

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The Affordable Care Act’s impact on coverage, access to care, and systematic exclusion in our health care system The Affordable Care Act set off an unprecedented wave of health insurance enrollment as the most sweeping overhaul of the U.S. health insurance system since 1965. In the years since its enactment, some 20 million uninsured Americans gained access to coverage. And yet, the law remained unpopular and politically vulnerable. While the ACA extended social protections to some groups, its implementation was troubled and the act itself created new forms of exclusion.  Access to affordable coverage options were highly segmented by state of residence, income, and citizenship status. Unequal Coverage documents the everyday experiences of individuals and families across the U.S. as they attempted to access coverage and care in the five years following the passage of the ACA.It argues that while the Affordable Care Act succeeded in expanding access to care, it did so unevenly, ultimately also generating inequality and stratification. The volume investigates the outcomes of the ACA in communities throughout the country and provides up-close, intimate portraits of individuals and groups trying to access and provide health care for both the newly insured and those who remain uncovered. The contributors use the ACA as a lens to examine more broadly how social welfare policies in a multiracial and multiethnic democracy purport to be inclusive while simultaneously embracing certain kinds of exclusions. Unequal Coverage concludes with an examination of the Affordable Care Act’s uncertain legacy under the new Presidential administration and considers what the future may hold for the American health care system. The book illustrates lessons learned and reveals how the law became a flashpoint for battles over inequality, fairness, and the role of government.More books on the health care debate
    Show book
  • The Conservative Intellectual Movement in America Since 1945 - cover

    The Conservative Intellectual...

    George H. Nash

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    First published in 1976, and revised in 1996, George H. Nash’s celebrated history of the postwar conservative intellectual movement has become the unquestioned standard in the field. This new edition, published in commemoration of the volume’s thirtieth anniversary, includes a new preface by Nash and will continue to instruct anyone interested in how today’s conservative movement was born. 
    Show book
  • The Ethics of Voting - cover

    The Ethics of Voting

    Jason Brennan

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Nothing is more integral to democracy than voting. Most people believe that every citizen has the civic duty or moral obligation to vote, that any sincere vote is morally acceptable, and that buying, selling, or trading votes is inherently wrong. In this provocative book, Jason Brennan challenges our fundamental assumptions about voting, revealing why it is not a duty for most citizens--in fact, he argues, many people owe it to the rest of us not to vote. 
     Bad choices at the polls can result in unjust laws, needless wars, and calamitous economic policies. Brennan shows why voters have duties to make informed decisions in the voting booth, to base their decisions on sound evidence for what will create the best possible policies, and to promote the common good rather than their own self-interest. They must vote well--or not vote at all. Brennan explains why voting is not necessarily the best way for citizens to exercise their civic duty, and why some citizens need to stay away from the polls to protect the democratic process from their uninformed, irrational, or immoral votes. 
     In a democracy, every citizen has the right to vote. This book reveals why sometimes it's best if they don't. In a new afterword, "How to Vote Well," Brennan provides a practical guidebook for making well-informed, well-reasoned choices at the polls.
    Show book
  • Restraint - A New Foundation for US Grand Strategy - cover

    Restraint - A New Foundation for...

    Barry R. Posen

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The United States, Barry R. Posen argues in Restraint, has grown incapable of moderating its ambitions in international politics. Since the collapse of Soviet power, it has pursued a grand strategy that he calls "liberal hegemony," one that Posen sees as unnecessary, counterproductive, costly, and wasteful. Written for policymakers and observers alike, Restraint explains precisely why this grand strategy works poorly and then provides a carefully designed alternative grand strategy and an associated military strategy and force structure. In contrast to the failures and unexpected problems that have stemmed from America’s consistent overreaching, Posen makes an urgent argument for restraint in the future use of U.S. military strength. After setting out the political implications of restraint as a guiding principle, Posen sketches the appropriate military forces and posture that would support such a strategy. He works with a deliberately constrained notion of grand strategy and, even more important, of national security (which he defines as including sovereignty, territorial integrity, power position, and safety). His alternative for military strategy, which Posen calls "command of the commons," focuses on protecting U.S. global access through naval, air, and space power, while freeing the United States from most of the relationships that require the permanent stationing of U.S. forces overseas.
    Show book
  • Struggle or Starve - Working-Class Unity in Belfast's 1932 Outdoor Relief Riots - cover

    Struggle or Starve -...

    Seán Mitchell

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In October 1932, the streets of Belfast were gripped by vicious and widespread rioting that lasted the best part of a week. Thousands of unarmed demonstrators fought extended pitched battles against heavily-armed police. Unemployed workers and, indeed, whole working-class communities, dug trenches and built barricades to hold off the police assault. The event became known as the Outdoor Relief Riot—one of a very few instances in which class sympathy managed to trump sectarian loyalties in a city famous for its divisions.
    Show book
  • Against the Obamanet - cover

    Against the Obamanet

    Brian C. Anderson

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The Internet is a platform of ceaseless innovation that has transformed our lives in a remarkably short time. And the United States has led that revolution: of the 15 largest websites in the world, 10 are American. But all that is now under threat. In February 2015, the Federal Communications Commission imposed extensive regulatory controls on this vibrant digital universe in an effort to mandate “network neutrality.”In this Broadside, Brian C. Anderson explains how the FCC’s power grab for “neutrality” could be devastating for the most dynamic sector of the U.S. economy. Network neutrality is at odds with everything that made today’s Internet the market cornucopia that it is, and we must protect it from the encroach¬ments of Washington in order to foster its further growth.
    Show book