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October Song - cover

October Song

Paul Le Blanc

Publisher: Haymarket Books

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Summary

A panoramic account of the Russian Revolution of 1917 and its aftermath – animated by the lives, ideas and experiences of workers, peasants, intellectuals, artists, and revolutionaries of diverse persuasions – October Song vividly narrates the triumphs of those who struggled for a new society and created a revolutionary workers state. Yet despite profoundly democratic and humanistic aspirations, the revolution is eventually defeated by violence and authoritarianism. 
October Song highlights both positive and negative lessons of this historic struggle for human liberation.

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