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Delphi Complete Works of Paul Laurence Dunbar (Illustrated) - cover

Delphi Complete Works of Paul Laurence Dunbar (Illustrated)

Paul Laurence Dunbar

Publisher: Delphi Classics Ltd

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Summary

The first black writer in America to attain national prominence and establish an international reputation, Paul Laurence Dunbar is noted for his works written in black dialect. However, Dunbar also wrote in conventional English, producing sensitive and compelling poetry and fashioning innovative fiction. For the first time in publishing history, this eBook presents Dunbar’s complete works, with beautiful illustrations and the usual Delphi bonus material. (Version 1)
 
* Beautifully illustrated with images relating to Dunbar's life and works* Concise introduction to Dunbar’s life and poetry* Excellent formatting of the poems* Special chronological and alphabetical contents tables for the poetry* Easily locate the poems you want to read* Includes Dunbar's complete novels and short stories, available in no other collection* Rare uncollected stories * Features Wiggins' seminal biography on the poet - discover Dunbar's literary life* Scholarly ordering of texts into chronological order and literary genres
 
Please note: a few of Dunbar’s early short stories, which have only been rediscovered in recent years, are the result of dedicated scholarship and so will not be appearing in the eBook.
 
Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to see our wide range of poet titles
 
CONTENTS:
 
The Life and Poetry of Paul Laurence DunbarBRIEF INTRODUCTION: PAUL LAURENCE DUNBARCOMPLETE POETICAL WORKS OF PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR
 
The PoemsLIST OF POEMS IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDERLIST OF POEMS IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
 
The NovelsTHE UNCALLEDTHE LOVE OF LANDRYTHE FANATICSTHE SPORT OF THE GODS
 
The Short Story CollectionsFOLKS FROM DIXIETHE HEART OF HAPPY HOLLOWTHE STRENGTH OF GIDEON AND OTHER STORIESIN OLD PLANTATION DAYSUNCOLLECTED SHORT STORIES
 
The Short StoriesLIST OF SHORT STORIES IN CHRONOLOGICAL ORDERLIST OF SHORT STORIES IN ALPHABETICAL ORDER
 
The Non-FictionREPRESENTATIVE AMERICAN NEGROES
 
The BiographyTHE LIFE OF PAUL LAURENCE DUNBAR by L. K. Wiggins
 
Please visit www.delphiclassics.com to browse through our range of poetry titles or buy the entire Delphi Poets Series as a Super Set

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