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Beyond the Bungalow - cover

Beyond the Bungalow

Paul Duchscherer

Publisher: Gibbs Smith

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Summary

Beyond the Bungalow, the newest book from renowned designer and Arts & Crafts expert Paul Duchscherer, celebrates the larger members of the Arts & Crafts family, and pays tribute to their remarkable artistic beauty, craftsmanship, and diversity of style. 
Widely acclaimed as America's favorite "Arts & Crafts Home," the term "bungalow" may bring a specific image to mind, but it really is one part of a much larger family. This extended family also includes an entire genre of larger-scale Craftsman-period homes, much like those created by architect brothers Charles and Henry Greene.
Available since: 10/12/2005.
Print length: 176 pages.

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