Reading without limits, the perfect plan for #stayhome
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Burne-Jones - cover

Burne-Jones

Patrick Bade

Publisher: Parkstone International

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Burne-Jones’ oeuvre can be understood as an attempt to create in paint a world of perfect beauty, as far removed from the Birmingham of his youth as possible. At that time Birmingham was a byword for the dire effects of unregulated capitalism – a booming, industrial conglomeration of unimaginable ugliness and squalor. The two great French symbolist painters, Gustave Moreau and Pierre Puvis de Chavannes, immediately recognised Burne-Jones as an artistic fellow traveller. But, it is very unlikely that Burne-Jones would have accepted or even, perhaps, have understood the label of ‘symbolist’. Yet he seems to have been one of the most representative figures of the symbolist movement and of that pervasive mood termed “fin-de-siecle”. Burne-Jones is usually labelled as a Pre-Raphaelite. In fact he was never a member of the Brotherhood formed in 1848. Burne-Jones’ brand of Pre-Raphaelitism derives not from Hunt and Millais but from Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Burne-Jones’ work in the late 1850s is, moreover, closely based on Rossetti’s style. His feminine ideal is also taken from that of Rossetti, with abundant hair, prominent chins, columnar necks and androgynous bodies hidden by copious medieval gowns. The prominent chins remain a striking feature of both artists’ depictions of women. From the 1860s their ideal types diverge. As Rossetti’s women balloon into ever more fleshy opulence, Burne-Jones’ women become more virginal and ethereal to the point where, in some of the last pictures, the women look anorexic. In the early 1870s Burne-Jones painted several mythical or legendary pictures in which he seems to have been trying to exorcise the traumas of his celebrated affair with Mary Zambaco. No living British painter between Constable and Bacon enjoyed the kind of international acclaim that Burne-Jones was accorded in the early 1890s. This great reputation began to slip in the latter half of the decade, however, and it plummeted after 1900 with the triumph of Modernism. With hindsight we can see this flatness and the turning away from narrative as characteristic of early Modernism and the first hesitant steps towards Abstraction. It is not as odd at it seems that Kandinsky cited Rossetti and Burne-Jones as forerunners of Abstraction in his book, “Concerning the Spiritual in Art”.

Other books that might interest you

  • I Wrote This for You and Only You - cover

    I Wrote This for You and Only You

    Iain S. Thomas

    • 1
    • 7
    • 0
    The follow-up to the international #1 bestselling collection of prose and photography, I Wrote This For You And Only You is the third book in the I Wrote This For You series and gathers together the very best entries in the project from 2011 to 2015. Started in 2007, I Wrote This For You is an internationally acclaimed exploration of hauntingly beautiful words, photography and emotion that's unique to each person that reads it.
    Show book
  • Celebs At Home - cover

    Celebs At Home

    Andy Bush

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Andy has 30k Twitter followers and presents the afternoon show on Absolute Radio.Mel Giedroyc has provided an introduction – until December 2018 they presented a weekend show on Magic FM together.The cartoons have attracted the eye of celebrities like Ed Sheeran, Russell Brand and Biffy Clyro, who have autographed the cartoons for Bush to sell for the Teenage Cancer Trust.For fans of Chris (Simpsons Artist), Jim'll Paint It and What the Hell Are You Doing: The Essential David Shrigley.
    Show book
  • The Witch of Delray - Rose Veres & Detroit’s Infamous 1930s Murder Mystery - cover

    The Witch of Delray - Rose Veres...

    Karen Dybis

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Detroit was full of stark contrasts in 1931. Political scandals, rumrunners and mobs lurked in the shadows of the city's soaring architecture and industrious population. As the Great Depression began to take hold, tensions grew, spilling over into the investigation of a mysterious murder at the boardinghouse of Hungarian immigrant Rose Veres. Amid accusations of witchcraft, Rose and her son Bill were convicted of the brutal killing and suspected in a dozen more. Their cries of innocence went unheeded--until one lawyer, determined to seek justice, took on the case. Author Karen Dybis follows the twists and turns of this shocking story, revealing the truth of Detroit's own Hex Woman.
    Show book
  • Dear Me - cover

    Dear Me

    Iffah Nizar

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    A mini notebook for spiritual and self development, on the topic of self-love and appreciation. A 40-pages mini motivational notebook full of reminders for oneself and others. 
     
    For heart, mind and soul.
     
    Dear Me,
     
    For you,
     
    From me,
     
    With love.
    Show book
  • Hudson Valley Murder & Mayhem - cover

    Hudson Valley Murder & Mayhem

    Andrew K. Amelinckx

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Hudson Valley’s dark past, from Prohibition-era shoot-outs to unsolved murders, in eleven heart-pounding true stories.   The beautiful Hudson Valley of New York State is drenched in history, culture . . . and blood. This fascinating and thoroughly researched chronicle presents one killer story from every county in the region, including:   Sullivan County: In the fall of 1893, Lizzie Halliday left a trail of bodies in her wake, slaughtering two strangers and her husband before stabbing a nurse to death at the asylum where she lived.   Albany County: A Jazz Age politician, tired of fighting with his overbearing wife, murdered her and buried the body under the front porch.   Columbia County: In 1882, a cantankerous old miner, dubbed the “Austerlitz Cannibal” by the press, chopped up his partner before he himself swung from the end of a rope.
    Show book
  • Da Vinci Notebooks - cover

    Da Vinci Notebooks

    Leonardo da Vinci

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A singular fatality has ruled the destiny of nearly all the most famous of Leonardo da Vinci's works. Two of the three most important were never completed, obstacles having arisen during his life-time, which obliged him to leave them unfinished; namely the Sforza Monument and the Wall-painting of the Battle of Anghiari, while the third—the picture of the Last Supper at Milan—has suffered irremediable injury from decay and the repeated restorations to which it was recklessly subjected during the XVIIth and XVIIIth centuries. Nevertheless, no other picture of the Renaissance has become so wellknown and popular through copies of every description.
    Show book