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The Veins of the Ocean - 2017 WINNER OF THE DAYTON LITERARY PEACE PRIZE - cover

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The Veins of the Ocean - 2017 WINNER OF THE DAYTON LITERARY PEACE PRIZE

Patricia Engel

Publisher: Grove Press

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Summary

WINNER OF THE DAYTON LITERARY PEACE PRIZE 2017 
Reina Castillo's beloved brother is serving a death sentence for a crime that shocked the community - a crime for which Reina secretly blames herself. When she is at last released from her seven-year prison vigil, Reina moves to a sleepy town in the Florida Keys seeking anonymity. 
There, she meets Nesto, a recently exiled Cuban awaiting with hope the arrival of the children he left behind in Havana. Through Nesto's love of the sea and capacity for faith, Reina comes to understand her own connections to the life-giving and destructive forces of the ocean that surrounds her as well as its role in her family's troubled history.  
Set in the vibrant coastal and Caribbean communities of Miami; the Florida Keys; Havana, Cuba; and Cartagena, Colombia, The Veins of the Ocean is a wrenching exploration of what happens when life tests the limits of compassion, and a stunning and unforgettable portrait of fractured lives finding solace in the beauty and power of the natural world, and in one another.

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