Reading without limits, the perfect plan for #stayhome
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Being Mean - A Memoir of Sexual Abuse and Survival - cover

Being Mean - A Memoir of Sexual Abuse and Survival

Patricia Eagle

Publisher: She Writes Press

  • 0
  • 3
  • 0

Summary

In this richly depicted story, told in vignettes relative to markers of age and experience, Patricia Eagle reveals the heartbreak and destruction of her sexual abuse, from age four to thirteen, by her father. A victim of her father’s anger and her mother’s complacency with his abusive behavior, Eagle uses dissociation and numbing in response to the abuse, and as a way to block her own sense of self. 



How does a child confused by episodes of abuse come to know what is safe or unsafe, right or wrong, normal or abnormal? How does a young woman learn the difference between real love and a desire for sexual pleasure stimulated by abusive childhood sexual experiences? Careening through life, Eagle wonders how to trust others and, most importantly, herself. As a mature woman struggling to understand and live with her past, she remains earnest in her pursuit of clarity, compassion, and trust to build a stronger life. 



Being Mean is about blocking sexual abuse memories, having them surface, then learning how to acknowledge and live with incomprehensible experiences in the healthiest ways possible.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Later Diaries of Ned Rorem - 1961–1972 - cover

    The Later Diaries of Ned Rorem -...

    Ned Rorem

    • 2
    • 1
    • 0
    The esteemed American composer and unabashed diarist Ned Rorem provides a fascinating, brazenly intimate first-person account of his life and career during one of the most extraordinary decades of the twentieth century Ned Rorem is often considered an American treasure, one of the greatest contemporary composers in the US. In 1966, he revealed another side of his remarkable talent when The Paris Diary was published, and a year later, The New York Diary, both to wide critical acclaim. In The Later Diaries,Rorem continues to explore his world and his music in intimate journal form, covering the years 1961 to 1972, one of his most artistically productive decades. The Ned Rorem revealed in The Later Diaries is somewhat more mature and worldly than the young artist of the earlier works, but no less candid or daring, as he reflects on his astonishing life, loves, friendships, and rivalries during an epoch of staggering, sometimes volatile change. Writing with intelligence, insight, and honesty, he recalls time spent with some of the most famous, and infamous, artists of the era—Philip Roth, Christopher Isherwood, Tallulah Bankhead, and Edward Albee, among others—openly exploring his sexuality and his art while offering fascinating, sometimes blistering, views on the art of his contemporaries.
    Show book
  • Sophia's Story - A story of the unspeakable horror of child abuse - cover

    Sophia's Story - A story of the...

    Susan McKay

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In 1995, Sophia McColgan's father was sentenced to prison for the serial rape and abuse of his children over many years. He had first raped Sophia when she was only six. It had taken immense courage on the part of Sophia and her family to bring the murky, hidden world of family child abuse to the public gaze. 
    Then, in 1998, Susan McKay published Sophia's Story, one of the most acclaimed Irish books of modern times.  
    Now re-issued with a new introduction by Susan McKay, it records a triumph of the human spirit in the face of the most degrading and destructive betrayal of trust. Sophia McColgan, who now lives abroad, was Irish Person of the Year in 1998.
    Show book
  • Every Drop of Blood - The Momentous Second Inauguration of Abraham Lincoln - cover

    Every Drop of Blood - The...

    Edward Achorn

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A strikingly original book and the best kind of micro-history, in which one particular event illuminates a much wider world—in this case the era of the Civil War. Through the lens of certain key characters among the thousands in Washington, D.C. to witness Abraham Lincoln’s second inaugural address on March 4, 1865, Edward Achorn brings vividly to life the tensions that beset the nation before, during, and after the Civil War. Achorn fluidly weaves quotations from letters, diaries, and other accounts of those who were in Washington into his own elegant narrative, pulling readers close to the scenes he describes. Achorn’s rich cast of characters includes Salmon P. Chase, recently appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Court but ever-yearning to be president; wounded colonel Selden Connor of Maine in one of D.C.’s 21 horrifying hospitals; young nurse Clara Barton intent on gaining presidential approval of her plan to identify tens of thousands of unidentified dead soldiers on both sides; Frederick Douglass, whose earlier anger at Lincoln’s hesitancy to abolish slavery had gradually warmed to respect for his tenacity; Noah Brooks, close friend of Lincoln’s and perceptive D.C. correspondent for the Sacramento Daily Union; photographer Alexander Gardner, whose pathbreaking images of the dead at Antietam had brought the horror of war into homes across the country; Walt Whitman, correspondent for the New York Times and ever-present consoler of the wounded in D.C. hospitals; and John Wilkes Booth, consumed by hatred of what Lincoln’s war had done to the old South he loved, yet also deeply in love with Lucy Hale, daughter of a northern senator. The book contains many indelible scenes: The President’s Room at the Capitol on the eve of the inauguration, where Lincoln signed last-minute legislation into law and received the stunning telegram from Grant saying that Lee had requested a meeting to discuss terms of peace; Lincoln’s bodyguard Ward Hill Lamon lecturing the president on his habit of going to the theatre without a security detail; John Wilkes Booth almost getting to Lincoln during the inauguration and later admitting to a friend he could have killed Lincoln that day and would have “lived in history”; and Frederick Douglass’s presence among the estimated 10,000 people who shook Lincoln’s hand at the White House the evening of the inauguration and later proclaimed his speech “a sacred effort.” However much we revere Lincoln’s memory today, Achorn makes clear that at the time he was reviled as much in the North as he was in the South. It is miraculous that he was elected twice, and stunning to consider how much was lost and how history was altered by his assassination. Jacket quotes have been promised by a number of well-known historians, including James McPherson, Gordon Wood, and Harold Holzer. We are also soliciting Drew Gilpin Faust, among others. We will publish on March 4, 2020, the 155th anniversary of Lincoln’s famous speech—and at the start of a hugely consequential American election season.
    Show book
  • Of Freedom and God - cover

    Of Freedom and God

    Marjan Rožanc

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Of Freedom and God, Jeremi Slak and Jason Blake’s translation of essays by Marjan Rožanc, contains a selection of essays from the 1995 collection »O svobodi in bogu" (Of Freedom and God) that Andrej Inkret put together and edited. Left out of the English translation are primarily those essays that are very local in nature; the red thread of the essays included in the English translation show a “European dimension” and an openness to the broader spiritual and literary space which at the same time is always realized in the most intimate and narrow of surroundings. As Andrej Inkret writes in his afterword to the collection: “from the very first texts, [Rožanc’s essays] are based on questioning any apodictic, purely rationalistic answers. Moreover, Rožanc’s essays are even derived from the thought that new-age man, with his unique, inimitable personal individuality as well as his socio-political being, is placed into an open, free, uncertain world in which there are no longer, and no longer can be, any more a priori, self-understood and unambiguous 'transcendent’ values that might, from the outset, afford man a firm point of reference, thought or, for example, a home.”
    Show book
  • Memory Is Our Home - Loss and Remembering: Three Generations in Poland and Russia 1917-1960s - cover

    Memory Is Our Home - Loss and...

    Suzanna Eibuszyc

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Memory Is Our Home is a powerful biographical memoir based on the diaries of Roma Talasiewicz-Eibuszyc, who was born in Warsaw before the end of World War I, grew up during the interwar period and who, after escaping the atrocities of World War II, was able to survive in the vast territories of Soviet Russia and Uzbekistan. 
    Translated by her own daughter, interweaving her own recollections as her family made a new life in the shadows of the Holocaust in Communist Poland after the war and into the late 1960s, this book is a rich, living document, a riveting account of a vibrant young woman's courage and endurance. 
    A forty-year recollection of love and loss, of hopes and dreams for a better world, it provides richly-textured accounts of the physical and emotional lives of Jews in Warsaw and of survival during World War II throughout Russia. This book, narrated in a compelling, unique voice through two generations, is the proverbial candle needed to keep memory alive.
    Show book
  • Raising Myself - A Memoir of Neglect Shame and Growing Up Too Soon - cover

    Raising Myself - A Memoir of...

    Beverly Engel

    • 3
    • 3
    • 0
    • Engel is a best-selling author of twenty-two self-help books, many about abuse recovery, and a highly respected advocate and expert on abus recovery who speaks at conferences around the world; most people who buy one of her books usually buy others. 
    • Author has a media presence due to her many years of being on TV and radio (most notably The Oprah Show and CNN) and the numerous newspaper and magazine articles that have been written about her books (The Washington Post, LA Times, The Chicago Tribune, Denver Post, Cleveland Plain Dealer, Oprah Magazine, Cosmopolitan, Marie Claire, Redbook, Good Housekeeping, Shape, etc.).
    • Nearly 700,000 children are abused in the US annually. An estimated 683,000 children (unique incidents) were victims of abuse and neglect in 2015, the most recent year for which there is national data.
    • 1 in 5 girls and 1 in 20 boys is a victim of child sexual abuse; self-report studies show that 20% of adult females and 5-10% of adult males recall a childhood sexual assault or sexual abuse incident, and according to a 2003 National Institute of Justice report, 3 out of 4 adolescents who have been sexually assaulted were victimized by someone they knew well.
    
    AUDIENCE:
    • Anyone who has read any of Engel’s previous books, especially It Wasn’t Your Fault, Healing Your Emotional Self, The Emotionally Abused Woman, The Emotionally Abusive Relationship, and Breaking the Cycle of Abuse
    • Former victims of childhood abuse (emotional, physical, sexual)
    • Former victims who repeated the cycle of abuse by becoming abusive themselves
    • Family and friends of former victims of childhood abuse
    • Readers interested in abuse memoirs
    • Professionals who work with victims of child abuse
    Show book