Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
The Sociopath's Guide to Getting Ahead - Tips for the Dark Art of Manipulation - cover

The Sociopath's Guide to Getting Ahead - Tips for the Dark Art of Manipulation

P. T. Elliott

Publisher: Skyhorse Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

A scathingly satirical parody of business and career self-help books. 
 
Can you be manipulative or irresponsible? Do you occasionally experience a lack of guilt or empathy? Can you be impulsive and feel a need for excitement? Well, these traits are the hallmarks of the sociopath inside you, and it’s time to embrace it! The time to unleash your inner sociopath has never been more right—just look at today’s world leaders and most popular personalities. And it’s time to get yours. 
 
Shoot up the promotional ladder and become the predator at the top of the corporate food chain with The Sociopath’s Guide to Getting Ahead. Find the perfect job for the sociopath in you, fabricate your resume to perfection, and manufacture the perfect first impression to ace those interviews. Prey on the biases and manipulate the psychology of your coworkers to break them down. Engineer conflict, manipulate the flow of attention, and seize power for yourself. Play the office party to perfection. Learn how to fake naturalness, make the right allies, and take down your enemies. And take it all the way to the bank. 
 
A scathing, tongue-in-cheek take on Dale Carnegie’s How to Win Friends and Influence People, the self-help industry, and our world today, featuring cameos by Dostoyevsky, Plato, Robert Greene, Malcolm Gladwell and many others, The Sociopath’s Guide to Getting Ahead is the practical satire we need. 
 
“P. T. Elliott utilizes deft humor to help us seize upon the greater cause of exposing these dangerous people and removing them from positions of power. This is a cathartic and essential piece of writing.” —Richard Kelly, writer/director of Donnie Darko and Southland Tales 
 
“Hilarious, pitch-black satire. An exquisitely researched, deliciously subversive antidote to every worthless self-help book ever published, The Sociopath’s Guide to Getting Ahead will channel YOUR inner Donald J. Trump to WIN, WIN, WIN!” — John A. Wooden, creator of WHITEHOUSE.ORG 
 
“Who’s winning? Not you, suckers—at least not unless you’re following the rules set forth in P.T. Elliott’s hilarious user’s guide to the world we’ve been dumb and selfish enough to create. Who says timely, depressing, and despicable can’t be funny?” —Eric Konigsberg, author of Blood Relation
Available since: 03/13/2018.
Print length: 196 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Tao and the Bard - A Conversation - cover

    The Tao and the Bard - A...

    Phillip DePoy

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Shakespeare and Lao Tzu match wits and wisdom in this playful encounter—a new take on the old dialogue between East and West.    The Tao Te Ching or Book of the Way of Virtue is a touchstone of Eastern philosophy and mysticism. It has been called the wisest book ever written, and its author, Lao Tzu, is known as the Great Archivist. Shakespeare, the Bard, was the West’s greatest writer and even invented human nature, according to some. The Tao and the Bard is the delightful Laoziviews in its pages. Here, in his own words, Lao Tzu offers the eighty-one verses that comprise the Tao, and, responding to each verse, the Bard answers with quotations from his plays and poems. In sometimes surprising ways, Shakespeare’s words speak to Lao Tzu’s, as the two trade observations on good and evil, love and virtue, wise fools and foolish wisdom, and being and the “nothing from which all things are born.” Here is a new take on an old dialogue between East and West, with the reader invited to take part—whether to parse the meanings closely or sit back and enjoy the entertainment.
    Show book
  • Llama Drama - A two-woman 5500-mile cycling adventure through South America - cover

    Llama Drama - A two-woman...

    Anna McNuff

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    **WINNER of the 2020 Amazon Storyteller Literary Award** 
    "Llama Drama is simply hilarious. If anyone wants something witty and moving at the same time. Also, something empowering, then this is the one for them. I literally inhaled it." -  Claudia Winkleman, TV Presenter and Author 
    What listeners are saying about Llama Drama: 
    ★★★★★ “Loved every minute of it!” 
    ★★★★★ “An antidote for the madness of 2020” 
    ★★★★★ “Honest, kind and real.” 
    BOOK DESCRIPTION 
    "Why take the shortest, most direct route through life, when you could choose the wiggliest, most mountainous one possible? 
    Armed with a limited grasp of Spanish and determined to meet as many llamas as possible, Anna and her friend Faye set off on a 6-month journey along the spine of the largest mountain range in the world - the Andes. 
    Beginning in the bustling city of La Paz, the duo pedal south - through dense jungle, across pristine white salt flats and past towering volcanoes, following the path of thundering glacial rivers to the snow-tipped peaks of Patagonia. 
    Sleeping wild in their tents most nights, they endure 50-mph crosswinds and catastrophic crashes, and go head to head with one very determined saddle sore called Sally. By the time they make it to the southernmost tip of the continent, they have cycled 5,500 miles and ascended over 100,000 metres through the mighty Andes - equivalent to 11 times the height of Everest. 
    Told from the seat of Anna's bicycle, Llama Drama is a witty and compelling account of life at its rawest and most rich. For anyone who has ever wanted to journey through the stunning natural landscapes of South America - this story is for you.
    Show book
  • Moxon’s Master - cover

    Moxon’s Master

    Ambrose Bierce

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Long before the word robot grew familiar a chess playing automaton breaks free of control with serious consequences for its’ inventor. A cautionary tale for our present A.I. Age.
    Show book
  • The Player - cover

    The Player

    Michael Tolkin

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The “shrewd, entertainingly dark Hollywood novel” that inspired the award-winning Robert Altman film (The New York Times Book Review).    Hollywood insider Michael Tolkin perfectly skewers the movie-making business through the mind of Griffin Mill, senior vice president of production at a major Hollywood studio. Ruthlessly ambitious, Mill is driven to control the levers of America’s dream-making machinery. He listens to writers pitch him stories all day, sitting in judgment of their fantasies, their lives. But now one writer whose pitch he responded to so glibly is sending him mortally threatening postcards.   Squeezed between the threat to his life and the threat to his job, Mill’s deliberate and horrifying response spins him into a nightmare. Then he meets the sad and beautiful June Mercator and his obsession for her threatens to destroy them both.   “One of the most wounding and satirical of all Hollywood exposes.” —Los Angeles Times   “In its wry, acerbic description of life behind the studio gates Tolkin’s book recalls F. Scott Fitzgerald . . . and the vengeful comedy of Nathaniel West’s The Day of the Locust.” —The Philadelphia Inquirer
    Show book
  • The Mikado Or The Town Of Titipu - cover

    The Mikado Or The Town Of Titipu

    W.S. Gilbert

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Not Yet Available
    Show book
  • A History of Scottish Football in 100 Objects - The Alternative Football Museum - cover

    A History of Scottish Football...

    Andy Bollen

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The comedy writer’s collection of “artifacts dedicated to controversial, silly and bonkers mishaps . . . [a] tribute to an alternative football history” (Daily Record). Andy Bollen has created a fantasy football museum to collect together a treasure trove of Scottish football exhibits that ranges from Jimmy Johnstone’s oar to Aggie the tea lady’s trolley. Learn why Puskás and Socrates should’ve been Scottish, the versatility of the pie and Napoleon’s links to Bovril and explore all the wonders of the game north of the Border—from Arthur Montford to the phone-in, Think Tanks, Buckfast, vanishing cream for referees, Twitter, VAR technology and flares (pyrotechnics, not 1970s attire). These exhibits distill the beauty of Scottish football into an entertaining volume that will make the perfect gift for any fan. Taking a satirical swipe at the beautifully flawed game, A History of Scottish Football in 100 Objects covers the mayhem, mavericks and bric-a-brac from the magic sponge, to the pie, hair weaves to tattoos. Bollen is the perfect curator: impeccably informed, passionate and insightful. “It’s not Hampden Babylon, but it’s very funny.” —Stuart Cosgrove, author of Hampden Babylon
    Show book