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Introducing Mind and Brain - A Graphic Guide - cover

Introducing Mind and Brain - A Graphic Guide

Oscar Zarate, Angus Gellatly

Publisher: Icon Books

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Summary

How do emotions affect your basic decision making? Why do certain smells prompt long-forgotten memories, and what makes us suddenly self-conscious?


How does the biological organ, the brain, give rise to all of the thoughts in your head – enable you to think, to feel, to be conscious and aware – to have ‘a mind’?


Introducing Mind and Brain explains what the sciences have to say about planning and action, language, memory, attention, emotions and vision. It traces the historical development of ideas about the brain and its function from antiquity to the age of neuro-imaging.


Clearly explained by Professor of Psychology Angus Gellatly and award-winning artist Oscar Zarate, they invite you to take a fresh look at the nature of mind, consciousness and personal identity.

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