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An Ideal Husband - A Play - cover

An Ideal Husband - A Play

Oscar Wilde

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

The classic comedic play of blackmail and political corruption from a master dramatist.   A blackmail scheme forces a married couple to reexamine their moral standards—providing, along the way, a wry commentary on the rarity of politicians who can claim to be ethically pure. With a supporting cast of young lovers, society matrons, an overbearing father, and a formidable femme fatale exchanging nonstop sparkling repartee, Oscar Wilde’s classic play moves along at a lively pace.   Like most of Wilde’s works, this scintillating drawing-room comedy is wise, well constructed, and deeply satisfying. An instant success upon its 1895 debut, An Ideal Husband continues to delight audiences over one hundred years later with its wit, urbanity, and timeless sophistication.  This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

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