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Roads of Destiny (Serapis Classics) - cover

Roads of Destiny (Serapis Classics)

O. Henry

Publisher: Serapis Classics

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Summary

"A collection of short stories, some funny, with twist endings. O.Henry's style is witty, but sometimes difficult to understand. He often introduces his stories with his view on American history and society, which is not always easy to understand for the modern reader. The stories are inventive and creative. A nice discovery." - Paul Groos

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