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Typin’ ‘Bout My Generation - Write the legacy only you can leave - cover

Typin’ ‘Bout My Generation - Write the legacy only you can leave

Ninie Hammon

Publisher: Sterling & Stone

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Summary

There is a storyteller in you.
 
She doesn't care how old you are. She doesn't care if you're retired, semi-retired, nearing retirement or just over it. She doesn't care if you used to be a repairman, or an accountant, or a rodeo clown. She doesn't care how sure you are that it's too late to start something new.
 
There is a storyteller in you. And it's time you started listening.
 
My name is Ninie Hammon and I'm 72 years old. (If you say 72 years young, I will reach out from this page and punch you in the face.)
 
I started writing my first book when I was 58. Too late? Nonsense. In fact, it was the perfect time to start writing.
 
In this short little book, I'll do my best to show you that ...  - Retirement is the perfect time to start writing.  - Expendable time is the most valuable time there is.  - Technology sucks, but it also doesn't matter.  - Readers matter even more than you think.  - Community is the secret sauce on everything.  - Doing the thing is the most important thing.
 
And so much more. Or maybe just those things. But also stories! And tangents. So many tangents. And references only you will get.
 
There's even something in here for *gasp* people that aren't 72 yet. Or 52. Or even 32.
 
It's time to stop thinking about who you were before and consider who you can be right now. It's time to become a storyteller.

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