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Nothing Can Hurt You - cover

Nothing Can Hurt You

Nicola Maye Goldberg

Publisher: Bloomsbury Publishing

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Summary

BEST BOOKS OF SUMMER 2020 - PEOPLE MAGAZINE, VOGUE, CNN, REFINERY29, CRIMEREADS, and more 
 
“Captivating, serpentine, and affecting.” -Megan Abbott 
 
“A gothic Olive Kitteridge mixed with Gillian Flynn . . . Masterful.” -Vogue 
 
“Fascinating.” -Sarah Lyall, New York Times Book Review 
 
“Gripping and tremendously searing.” -Leslie Jamison 
 
“Reinvents the thriller for a new generation.” -Rebecca Godfrey 
 
“Gone Girl for the new decade.” -Vogue.com 
 
“A beautifully crafted novel with a terrifying story to tell. I couldn't put it down.” -Paul La Farge 
 
Inspired by a true story, this haunting debut novel pieces together a chorus of voices to explore the aftermath of a college student's death. 
  
 On a cold day in 1997, student Sara Morgan was killed in the woods surrounding her liberal arts college in upstate New York. Her boyfriend, Blake Campbell, confessed, his plea of temporary insanity raising more questions than it answered. 
  
 In the wake of his acquittal, the case comes to haunt a strange and surprising network of community members, from the young woman who discovers Sara's body to the junior reporter who senses its connection to convicted local serial killer John Logan. Others are looking for retribution or explanation: Sara's half sister, stifled by her family's bereft silence about Blake, poses as a babysitter and seeks out her own form of justice, while the teenager Sara used to babysit starts writing to Logan in prison. 
  
 A propulsive, taut tale of voyeurism and obsession, Nothing Can Hurt You dares to examine gendered violence not as an anomaly, but as the very core of everyday life. Tracing the concentric circles of violence rippling out from Sara's murder, Nicola Maye Goldberg masterfully conducts an unforgettable chorus of disparate voices.

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