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Belief - An Illustrated Christmas Short Story - cover

Belief - An Illustrated Christmas Short Story

Nicholas Garbini

Publisher: Publishdrive

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Summary

A Santa Claus Origins Tale
 
As town villagers, Nicholas and his wife do not know that their lives are about to change. What sparked as an idea becomes an enchanted adventure into the mystical spirit of Christmas. Their wish of bringing Christmas cheer to children is not as easy as they expected, however, and they quickly realize they need extra help before time runs out. Beyond what is thought to be possible, they discover something wonderful about the magic of belief.
Available since: 10/13/2022.
Print length: 90 pages.

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