If you like reading, you will LOVE reading without limits!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Rule-breakers – Why ‘Being There’ Trumps ‘Being Fair’ in Ireland - Uncovering Ireland’s National Psyche - cover

Rule-breakers – Why ‘Being There’ Trumps ‘Being Fair’ in Ireland - Uncovering Ireland’s National Psyche

Niamh Hourigan

Publisher: Gill Books

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Ireland is a nation on a value system that equates ‘being good’ with ‘being there for each other’. As a society we favour ‘minding our own’ over ‘doing what we’re told’. So far, so Irish.It’s become a commonplace to refer to the excesses of the Celtic Tiger years as an aberration, the product of a short-lived and inexplicable mania for cheap credit and unregulated consumption. But what if the roots of Ireland’s economic crisis ran far deeper than the property boom or the hubris of the establishment elites who enabled it?In this, a ground-breaking survey of the Irish national character from its colonial history to its current day dramas, acclaimed sociologist Niamh Hourigan draws on a wealth of new and compelling research to reveal the fundamental conflict at the heart of the Irish society: that between our traditional faith in the politics of intimacy, all handshakes and favours, and the ruling systems in which we’ve invested power.The Ireland that emerges from her research is a country where outcomes are decided by who rather than what you know, and where – for good or for bad – rules are very much made to be broken.‘Probing, perceptive and highly readable exploration of the Irish value system’J. J. Lee, New York University‘Compulsively readable’Kathy Sheridan, The Irish Times‘Lucid, engaging and persuasive … every politician should read this – and so should every voter’Colin Murphy, The Guarantee

Other books that might interest you

  • Creative Mythology - cover

    Creative Mythology

    Joseph Campbell

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Explore the power of myth as it exploded from medieval Europe into the modern world
     
    In this fourth volume of The Masks of God — Joseph Campbell's major work of comparative mythology — the pre-eminent mythologist looks at the birth of the modern, individualistic mythology as it developed in Europe beginning in the twelfth century A.D. up through the modernist art of the twentieth century.
     
    The Masks of God is a four-volume study of world religion and myth that stands as one of Joseph Campbell's masterworks. On completing it, he wrote: 
     
    Its main result for me has been the confirmation of a thought I have long and faithfully entertained: of the unity of the race of man, not only in its biology, but also in its spiritual history, which has everywhere unfolded in the manner of a single symphony, with its themes announced, developed, amplified and turned about, distorted, reasserted, and today, in a grand fortissimo of all sections sounding together, irresistibly advancing to some kind of mighty climax, out of which the next great movement will emerge.
     
    This new digital edition, part of the Collected Works of Joseph Campbell series, includes over forty new illustrations.
     
    (Comparative Mythology: Christianity, Middle Ages, Renaissance, Arthurian Romance, Modernism)
    Show book
  • Get People to Do What You Want - How to Use Body Language and Words for Maximum Effect - cover

    Get People to Do What You Want -...

    Gregory Hartley, Maryann Karinch

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    A former Army interrogator shares his secrets for getting exactly what you want out of anyone, anytime.In business, school, romance, or your neighborhood, it is valuable to know what attracts people, what repels them, and what makes them tick. Choosing the right approach will enable you to influence people to do what you want in professional and social situations. The authors include updated case studies—some pulled from the headlines—of how this technique has worked to create both good news and bad news. Most importantly and all new, they tell you how to identify and guard against manipulation so you remain in control of your choices and options.In Get People to Do What You Want, you’ll learn about:One-on-one interactionGroup dynamicsThe projection of leadershipInstinctual trust and mistrust of othersGet People to Do What You Want is the perfect, modern complement to Dale Carnegie’s 1937 classic work on the topic, How to Win Friends and Influence People. Think of these books as the Old and New Testaments of persuasion.
    Show book
  • The Sten Gun - cover

    The Sten Gun

    Leroy Thompson

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Sten submachine gun – officially the 'Carbine, Machine, Sten' – was developed to fulfill the pressing British need for large quantities of cheaply produced weapons after Dunkirk, when German invasion was a very real possibility. Over four million were built during World War II, and the Sten was widely used by airborne troops, tankers, and others who needed a compact weapon with substantial firepower. It proved especially popular with Resistance fighters as it was easy to conceal, deadly at close range, and could fire captured German ammunition – with a design so simple that Resistance fighters were able to produce them in bicycle shops. Featuring vivid first-hand accounts, specially commissioned full-colour artwork and close-up photographs, this is the fascinating story of the mass-produced submachine gun that provided Allied soldiers and Resistance fighters with devastating close-range firepower.
    Show book
  • Venice's Intimate Empire - Family Life and Scholarship in the Renaissance Mediterranean - cover

    Venice's Intimate Empire -...

    Erin Maglaque

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    Mining private writings and humanist texts, Erin Maglaque explores the lives and careers of two Venetian noblemen, Giovanni Bembo and Pietro Coppo, who were appointed as colonial administrators and governors. In Venice’s Intimate Empire, she uses these two men and their families to showcase the relationship between humanism, empire, and family in the Venetian Mediterranean.Maglaque elaborates an intellectual history of Venice’s Mediterranean empire by examining how Venetian humanist education related to the task of governing. Taking that relationship as her cue, Maglaque unearths an intimate view of the emotions and subjectivities of imperial governors. In their writings, it was the affective relationships between husbands and wives, parents and children, humanist teachers and their students that were the crucible for self-definition and political decision making. Venice’s Intimate Empire thus illuminates the experience of imperial governance by drawing connections between humanist education and family affairs. From marriage and reproduction to childhood and adolescence, we see how intimate life was central to the Bembo and Coppo families’ experience of empire. Maglaque skillfully argues that it was within the intimate family that Venetians’ relationships to empire—its politics, its shifting social structures, its metropolitan and colonial cultures—were determined.
    Show book
  • The Boy Who Loved the Moon - cover

    The Boy Who Loved the Moon

    Thérèse Corfiatis

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Boy Who Loved the Moon is an exploration of a mother’s love. It is a love that transcends what most experience, because the respites from reality are so fleeting. Thérèse Corfiatis’s narrative poem, though acting as a chronicle of her son’s journey from birth, is in reality a mother’s travail. This is a defining journey where the issues and values that confront a parent with a child who is different shape the person and in doing so measure the dimensions of love. The simplicity of this narrative in verse belies the emotional anguish that underlies the journey. When reading these poems, the heart bleeds a little but is quickly healed because the author gives you permission to experience her love.
    Show book
  • Homo Deus - A Brief History of Tomorrow - cover

    Homo Deus - A Brief History of...

    Yuval Noah Harari

    • 7
    • 21
    • 0
    Official U.S. edition with full color illustrations throughout. 
    NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER  
    Yuval Noah Harari, author of the critically-acclaimed New York Times bestseller and international phenomenon Sapiens, returns with an equally original, compelling, and provocative book, turning his focus toward humanity’s future, and our quest to upgrade humans into gods. 
    Over the past century humankind has managed to do the impossible and rein in famine, plague, and war. This may seem hard to accept, but, as Harari explains in his trademark style—thorough, yet riveting—famine, plague and war have been transformed from incomprehensible and uncontrollable forces of nature into manageable challenges. For the first time ever, more people die from eating too much than from eating too little; more people die from old age than from infectious diseases; and more people commit suicide than are killed by soldiers, terrorists and criminals put together. The average American is a thousand times more likely to die from binging at McDonalds than from being blown up by Al Qaeda. 
    What then will replace famine, plague, and war at the top of the human agenda? As the self-made gods of planet earth, what destinies will we set ourselves, and which quests will we undertake? Homo Deus explores the projects, dreams and nightmares that will shape the twenty-first century—from overcoming death to creating artificial life. It asks the fundamental questions: Where do we go from here? And how will we protect this fragile world from our own destructive powers? This is the next stage of evolution. This is Homo Deus. 
    With the same insight and clarity that made Sapiens an international hit and a New York Times bestseller, Harari maps out our future.
    Show book