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Disinherited Generations - Our Struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nations Women and their Descendants - cover

Disinherited Generations - Our Struggle to Reclaim Treaty Rights for First Nations Women and their Descendants

Nellie Carlson, Kathleen Steinhauer

Publisher: The University of Alberta Press

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Summary

Two Cree women tell the story of how they took on the Canadian government and helped change the lives of thousands. This oral autobiography of two remarkable Cree women tells their life stories against a backdrop of government discrimination, First Nations activism, and the resurgence of First Nations communities. Nellie Carlson and Kathleen Steinhauer, who helped to organize the Indian Rights for Indian Women movement in western Canada in the 1960s, fought the Canadian government’s interpretation of treaty and Aboriginal rights, the Indian Act, and the male power structure in their own communities in pursuit of equal rights for Aboriginal women and children. After decades of activism and court battles, First Nations women succeeded in changing these oppressive regulations, thus benefitting thousands of their descendants. Those interested in human rights, activism, history, and Native Studies will find that these personal stories, enriched by detailed notes and photographs, form a passionate record of an important, continuing struggle.
Available since: 07/03/2013.
Print length: 217 pages.

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