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From Sea to Sea - cover

From Sea to Sea

Nelda B. Gaydou

Publisher: Progressive Rising Phoenix Press, LLC

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Summary

From a three-week voyage of more than 7000 miles from New Orleans to Buenos Aires in 1964 through an eight-day, 3258-mile round-trip drive between Evanston, Illinois and Clovis, New Mexico in 2017, whether in their prime or in their nineties, the Bedfords have packed a lot into their life's journey. Follow their inspiring story of faith and service, set in fascinating times and places in the Southern and Northern Hemispheres.

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