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Bagnall Endon Stanley & Stockton Brook Through Time - cover

Bagnall Endon Stanley & Stockton Brook Through Time

Neil Collingwood

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

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Summary

Bagnall, Endon, Stanley and Stockton Brook are situated to the north-east of the Potteries conurbation in North Staffordshire and form a rough triangle pointing towards Leek. The busy A53 passes through Stockton Brook and Endon carrying traffic between Stoke-on-Trent and Leek, and also conveying many of the residents of the area to work. Despite being relatively affluent dormitory settlements, Stockton Brook and Endon do still manage to retain much of their village feel. Stanley, Bagnall and the original Endon village are on quieter backwaters and are therefore more rural still. There is virtually no industry apart from livestock farming in the area and such industry that was developed in the nineteenth century has now disappeared.This area's main interest lies in its ancient churches and farm buildings, its eighteenth-century canal and nineteenth-century railway and reservoir, not forgetting its popular and well-attended Well Dressing event, held every year since 1845. Bagnall, Endon, Stanley and Stockton Brook Through Time guides you on a nostalgic tour of these four North Staffordshire villages.

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