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Police State - The Police State Saga #1 - cover

Police State - The Police State Saga #1

Nathaniel Broadus

Publisher: Nathaniel Broadus

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Summary

Welcome to the POLICE STATE, an era, a country marred by political corruption.  Through government subterfuge, Senator Koehler has secured a controversial arms deal with China in order to flood local police departments with military grade tech.   He has manipulated the US military to launching to the stars in search of inhabitable worlds.  Without the power of military might to back them up, the President and his Cabinet fell like dominos, allowing Koehler, and his Commissioner, Gordon Cecil to assume ultimate power. 
This is the story of the POLICE STATE officers, the Citizens Resistance Union, and the Dark Side Crew street gang, as they attempt to navigate throughout the POLICE STATE.  This is a story of love, of hate and violence, of conflicting emotions. 
Come, take a trip to the POLICE STATE 
__________________________________ 
vol 1 
22 pages

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