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Unwritten Literature of Hawaii - The Sacred Songs of the Hula - cover

Unwritten Literature of Hawaii - The Sacred Songs of the Hula

Nathaniel Bright Emerson

Publisher: Musaicum Books

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Summary

This book represents a collection of Hawaiian songs and poetic pieces that have done service from time immemorial as the stock supply of the hula. The descriptive portions have been added, not because the poetical parts could not stand by themselves, but to furnish the proper setting and to answer the questions of those who want to know.
Available since: 05/07/2021.
Print length: 318 pages.

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