Read as much as you want at your own pace!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Toulouse-Lautrec - cover

Toulouse-Lautrec

Nathalia Brodskaya

Publisher: Parkstone International

  • 1
  • 3
  • 0

Summary

Lautrec studied with two of the most admired academic painters of the day, Léon Bonnat and Fernand Cormon. Lautrec’s time in the studios of Bonnat and Cormon had the advantage of introducing him to the nude as a subject. At that time life-drawing of the nude was the basis of all academic art training in nineteenth-century Paris. While still a student, Lautrec began to explore Parisian nightlife, which was to provide him with his greatest inspiration, and eventually undermined his health. Lautrec was an artist able to stamp his vision of the age in which he lived upon the imagination of future generations. Just as we see the English court of Charles I through the eyes of van Dyck and the Paris of Louis-Philippe through the eyes of Daumier, so we see the Paris of the 1890s and its most colourful personalities, through the eyes of Lautrec. The first great personality of Parisian nightlife whom Lautrec encountered – and a man who was to play an important role in helping Lautrec develop his artistic vision – was the cabaret singer Aristide Bruant. Bruant stood out as an heroic figure in what was the golden age of Parisian cabaret. Among the many other performers inspiring Lautrec in the 1890s were the dancers La Goulue and Valentin-le-Desossé (who both appear in the famous Moulin Rouge poster), and Jane Avril and Loïe Fuller, the singers Yvette Guilbert, May Belfort and Marcelle Lender, and the actress Réjane. Lautrec was, along with Degas, one of the great poets of the brothel. Degas explored the theme in the late 1870s in a series of monotype prints that are among his most remarkable and personal works. He depicts the somewhat ungainly posturing of the prostitutes and their clients with human warmth and a satirical humour that brings these prints closer to the art of Lautrec than anything else by Degas. However, the truthfulness with which Lautrec portrayed those aspects of life that most of his more respectable contemporaries preferred to sweep under the carpet naturally caused offence. The German critic Gensel probably spoke for many when he wrote: “There can of course be no talk of admiration for someone who is the master of the representation of all that is base and perverse. The only explanation as to how such filth – there can be no milder term for it – as Elles can be publicly exhibited without an outcry of indignations being heard is that one half of the general public does not understand the meaning of this cycle at all, and the other is ashamed of admitting that it does understand it.”

Other books that might interest you

  • The Perfect Crime: The Real Life Crime that Inspired Hitchcock’s Rope - Stranger Than Fiction #5 - cover

    The Perfect Crime: The Real Life...

    Fergus Mason

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Real crimes are stranger than fiction! 
      
    Leopold and Loeb were two wealthy law students who could buy anything. But they wanted the one thing that no amount of money could buy: life.  
      
    They wanted to create the Perfect Crime--to kidnap and murder a 14-year-old boy for the thrill of getting away with murder. 
     
    The crime was so horrifying that even legendary filmmaker Alfred Hitchcock took notice, and directed his version of the story: Rope. But the real story of the Rope is much more brutal and suspenseful than even Hitchcock could do justice to. 
      
    Read the real history in this thrilling true crime book.
    Show book
  • Freakalique Presents Patricia: Volume 1 - cover

    Freakalique Presents Patricia:...

    Freakalique

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    This is an erotic photography magazine featuring Patricia - containing 84 high-resolution nude photos that are not censored or edited, laid out in a digital magazine spread.
    
    You will be VERY PLEASED with your purchase if you are a fan of young naked women who are happy to show off for the camera!
    
    Our girls love to play with themselves, by hand and with toys. They all have a bunch of pictures that they would love to show you... You will get so hard from viewing these women pleasuring themselves. Trust me, you won't regret it...
    
    These girls are getting down and dirty, and it's available for you in a gallery of wild pictures in PDF format. Our girls pose in some of the most erotic photos ever!
    
    All models featured in our magazines are 18 years or older.
    Show book
  • The True Story Behind Alfred Hitchcock's The Wrong Man - Stranger Than Fiction #6 - cover

    The True Story Behind Alfred...

    Fergus Mason

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Read the shocking real stroy behind Hitchcock's classic film! 
     
    The Wrong Man tells the incredible tale of an innocent man falsely accused of a crime. That in itself is hardly an unusual story, but in this case, a string of unlikely coincidences and sheer bad luck built a seemingly airtight case against him.  
     
    It seemed that the entire justice system was deaf to his pleas and all too willing to ignore the evidence his defenders had worked so hard to unearth. In the end, it was only a slip by the real perpetrator that proved his innocence. 
    While the movie certainly had its share of truth, it was still a movie, and parts were fabricated.  
     
    This book tells the real story behind the movie.
    Show book
  • The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle - cover

    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle

    J. A. Giles, J. Ingram

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a collection of annals in Old English chronicling the history of the Anglo-Saxons. The original manuscript of the Chronicle was created late in the 9th century, probably in Wessex, during the reign of Alfred the Great (r. 871–899). Multiple copies were made of that one original and then distributed to monasteries across England, where they were independently updated. In one case, the Chronicle was still being actively updated in 1154.
    
    The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is an invaluable resource for anyone studying the history of England. It is definitely not light reading, but it is filled with fascinating and intriguing details of life in England before to just after the Norman Conquest.
    
    Michael Swanton's edition of the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle is a good, handy reference in modern English. A group of manuscripts (eight in all) rather than a single unified book, the Chronicle is the first continuously-maintained vernacular national historical work in Western history. Swanton has here translated and edited the manuscripts to form a continuous whole, and included extensive notes.
    
    A good successor to Garmonsway's parallel translation of the various Chronicle texts - good translation, ample notes, solid introduction. It also has good maps and supplementary material for the history.
    Show book
  • The Sapphire Affair: The True Story Behind Alfred Hitchcock's Topaz - Stranger Than Fiction #4 - cover

    The Sapphire Affair: The True...

    Fergus Mason

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The truth is stranger than fiction! 
     
    In October 1962 it looked to millions of people like the politicians of the United States and Russia were determined to push the other across the fatal line of launching a nuclear strike. The fate of the world hung on Cuba, a troubled island state in the Caribbean. 
     
    Woven through the dramatic events in and around Cuba was a quieter but perhaps equally dangerous scandal – an enormous, deeply embedded network of Soviet spies at the heart of the NATO alliance. A senior KGB defector had revealed that his agency had penetrated the highest levels of the French government, military, and intelligence services – but when a French agent tried to act he found himself blocked at every turn by his own superiors. 
     
    Alfred Hitchcock was so impressed by the fictional novel about the events (Topaz by Leon Uris) that he decided to adapt it into a movie. But fiction, as is often the case, only got half of the story.  
     
    This book tells the remarkable true account of one of the greatest espionage scandals to rock the Cold War.
    Show book
  • Visualizing Equality - African American Rights and Visual Culture in the Nineteenth Century - cover

    Visualizing Equality - African...

    Aston Gonzalez

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The fight for racial equality in the nineteenth century played out not only in marches and political conventions but also in the print and visual culture created and disseminated throughout the United States by African Americans. Advances in visual technologies--daguerreotypes, lithographs, cartes de visite, and steam printing presses--enabled people to see and participate in social reform movements in new ways. African American activists seized these opportunities and produced images that advanced campaigns for black rights. In this book, Aston Gonzalez charts the changing roles of African American visual artists as they helped build the world they envisioned. 
      
    Understudied artists such as Robert Douglass Jr., Patrick Henry Reason, James Presley Ball, and Augustus Washington produced images to persuade viewers of the necessity for racial equality, black political leadership, and freedom from slavery. Moreover, these activist artists' networks of transatlantic patronage and travels to Europe, the Caribbean, and Africa reveal their extensive involvement in the most pressing concerns for black people in the Atlantic world. Their work demonstrates how images became central to the ways that people developed ideas about race, citizenship, and politics during the nineteenth century.
    Show book