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Matilda (Roald Dahl) - cover

Matilda (Roald Dahl)

Nat Reed

Publisher: Classroom Complete Press

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Summary

Explore the power of the mind and how anything is possible if you put your mind to it. Challenge students by expanding their vocabulary and testing their comprehension with writing prompts and assessment questions. Test comprehension with multiple choice questions that explores the character of Matilda. Expand your character study by reflecting on Matilda's view of C.S. Lewis' novels, and what she considers to be a drawback in them. Show understanding of tricky words from the book by matching them to sentences where they make the most sense. Conduct an interview with a partner to find out what they think of the novel. Compare physical and character attributes of two people from the story in a Compare/Contrast chart. Aligned to your State Standards and written to Bloom's Taxonomy, additional crossword, word search, comprehension quiz and answer key are also included.
 
 
 
About the Novel: 
 
Matilda is the charming story of a very unusual little girl who, despite having two very horrible parents, learns how to read by the age of three. There are many other things about Matilda that are very special. She can solve arithmetic problems very quickly in her head, and she can move things about with the power of thought. Despite all of this she is a most pleasant little girl who is well liked by her classmates and by her wonderful teacher, Miss Honey. Matilda discovers the headmistress of the school, Miss Trunchbull, is actually Miss Honey‘s aunt and has cheated her out of her inheritance. Matilda sets her mind to work, and in the end Miss Honey recovers her stolen inheritance and adopts Matilda.

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