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Fuel - cover

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Fuel

Naomi Shihab Nye

Publisher: BOA Editions Ltd.

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Summary

Well known poet and anthologist, recipient of 3 Pushcart Prizes. Last book, Red Suitcase, published by BOA in November 94 has sold over 6400 copies. Also available: Words Under Words sold 7700 copies. Poems have appeared in The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times, Tar River Poetry and many others. Setting ranges from Middle Eastern settings to Chicago, Texas, and many other US locations. Annually is a featured poet at the National Teachers of High School English Conference. Good book to market to middle and high schools since she has been a popular writer-in-residence for school programs for many years. Has read twice at the United Nations. No competing titles.

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