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The Room of the Dead - cover

The Room of the Dead

M.R.C. Kasasian

Publisher: Head of Zeus

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Summary

'A rival for M.C. Beaton' Frost Magazine. 
 
DECEMBER, 1939. 
 
Having solved the case of the Suffolk Vampire, Inspector Betty Church and her colleagues at Sackwater Police Station have settled back down to business. There's the elderly Mr Fern who keeps losing his slippers, Sylvia Satin's thirteenth birthday party to attend and the scintillating case of the missing bookmark to solve. 
 
Though peace and quiet are all well and good, Betty soon finds herself longing for some cold-blooded murder... 
 
When a bomb is dropped on a residential street, both peace and quiet are broken and it seems the war has finally reached Sackwater. But Betty cannot stop the Hun, however hard she tries. So when a body is found on Sackwater's beach, Betty concentrates on finding the enemy much closer to home. 
 
'Eccentric and entertaining with a nicely complex plot' Crime Review. 
 
'A wonderfully gripping old-fashioned murder mystery' The Lady.

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